Essa página é mantida como memória documental do movimento Acesso Aberto, pelo professor Jorge Machado (USP)
Para informacoes atuais, visite Ciência Aberta



Documentos internacionais de apoio ao acesso aberto ao conhecimento

Uma das metas do Milenio de las Naciones Unidas: Fomentar una asociación mundial para el desarrollo

"En colaboración con el sector privado, velar por que se puedan aprovechar los beneficios de las nuevas tecnologías, en particular, los de las tecnologías de la información y de las comunicaciones"

http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/

Esta página contém os seguintes documentos (em ordem cronológica):

Budapest Open Access Initiative, February 14, 2002

Glasgow Declaration on Libraries, Information Services and Intellectual Freedom, August 19, 2002

Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing, June 20, 2003

ACRL Principles and Strategies for the Reform of Scholarly Communication, August 28, 2003

Wellcome Trust position statement on open access, October 1, 2003

Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities, October 22, 2003 (versión en castellano)

An IAP Statement on Access to Scientific Information. Mexico City, 4 December 2003

UN World Summit on the Information Society Declaration of Principles and Plan of Action, December 12, 2003
Cumbre Mundial de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Sociedade de la Información - Declaración de Principios, 12 de deciembre de 2003

OECD Declaration on Access to Research Data From Public Funding, January 30, 2004

IFLA Statement on Open Access to Scholarly Literature and Research Documentation, February 24, 2004

Australian Group of Eight Statement on open access to scholarly information, May 25, 2004

Declaration from Buenos Aires, Argentina -- I. Social Forum of Information, Documentation, and Libraries. August 28, 2004

Carta aberta de 25 ganhadores do Prêmio Nobel ao Congresso Americano em apoio em apoio ao acesso aberto a pesquisa financiada com fundos públicos - August 30, 2004

Declaração de Salvador sobre o Acesso Aberto - IX Congresso Mundial de Informação em Saúde Bibliotecas, 23 de setembro de 2005

Declaração de apoio ao acesso aberto à literatura científica - "Carta de São Paulo" - São Paulo, 02 de dezembro de 2005


Budapest Open Access Initiative
February 14, 2002

An old tradition and a new technology have converged to make possible an unprecedented public good. The old tradition is the willingness of scientists and scholars to publish the fruits of their research in scholarly journals without payment, for the sake of inquiry and knowledge. The new technology is the internet. The public good they make possible is the world-wide electronic distribution of the peer-reviewed journal literature and completely free and unrestricted access to it by all scientists, scholars, teachers, students, and other curious minds. Removing access barriers to this literature will accelerate research, enrich education, share the learning of the rich with the poor and the poor with the rich, make this literature as useful as it can be, and lay the foundation for uniting humanity in a common intellectual conversation and quest for knowledge.

For various reasons, this kind of free and unrestricted online availability, which we will call open access, has so far been limited to small portions of the journal literature. But even in these limited collections, many different initiatives have shown that open access is economically feasible, that it gives readers extraordinary power to find and make use of relevant literature, and that it gives authors and their works vast and measurable new visibility, readership, and impact. To secure these benefits for all, we call on all interested institutions and individuals to help open up access to the rest of this literature and remove the barriers, especially the price barriers, that stand in the way. The more who join the effort to advance this cause, the sooner we will all enjoy the benefits of open access.

The literature that should be freely accessible online is that which scholars give to the world without expectation of payment. Primarily, this category encompasses their peer-reviewed journal articles, but it also includes any unreviewed preprints that they might wish to put online for comment or to alert colleagues to important research findings. There are many degrees and kinds of wider and easier access to this literature. By "open access" to this literature, we mean its free availability on the public internet, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself. The only constraint on reproduction and distribution, and the only role for copyright in this domain, should be to give authors control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged and cited.

While  the peer-reviewed journal literature should be accessible online without cost to readers, it is not costless to produce. However, experiments show that the overall costs of providing open access to this literature are far lower than the costs of traditional forms of dissemination. With such an opportunity to save money and expand the scope of dissemination at the same time, there is today a strong incentive for professional associations, universities, libraries, foundations, and others to embrace open access as a means of advancing their missions. Achieving open access will require new cost recovery models and financing mechanisms, but the significantly lower overall cost of dissemination is a reason to be confident that the goal is attainable and not merely preferable or utopian.

To achieve open access to scholarly journal literature, we recommend two complementary strategies. 

I.  Self-Archiving: First, scholars need the tools and assistance to deposit their refereed journal articles in open electronic archives, a practice commonly called, self-archiving. When these archives conform to standards created by the Open Archives Initiative, then search engines and other tools can treat the separate archives as one. Users then need not know which archives exist or where they are located in order to find and make use of their contents.

II. Open-access Journals: Second, scholars need the means to launch a new generation of journals committed to open access, and to help existing journals that elect to make the transition to open access. Because journal articles should be disseminated as widely as possible, these new journals will no longer invoke copyright to restrict access to and use of the material they publish. Instead they will use copyright and other tools to ensure permanent open access to all the articles they publish. Because price is a barrier to access, these new journals will not charge subscription or access fees, and will turn to other methods for covering their expenses. There are many alternative sources of funds for this purpose, including the foundations and governments that fund research, the universities and laboratories that employ researchers, endowments set up by discipline or institution, friends of the cause of open access, profits from the sale of add-ons to the basic texts, funds freed up by the demise or cancellation of journals charging traditional subscription or access fees, or even contributions from the researchers themselves. There is no need to favor one of these solutions over the others for all disciplines or nations, and no need to stop looking for other, creative alternatives.


Open access to peer-reviewed journal literature is the goal. Self-archiving (I.) and a new generation of open-access journals (II.) are the ways to attain this goal. They are not only direct and effective means to this end, they are within the reach of scholars themselves, immediately, and need not wait on changes brought about by markets or legislation. While we endorse the two strategies just outlined, we also encourage experimentation with further ways to make the transition from the present methods of dissemination to open access. Flexibility, experimentation, and adaptation to local circumstances are the best ways to assure that progress in diverse settings will be rapid, secure, and long-lived.

The Open Society Institute, the foundation network founded by philanthropist George Soros, is committed to providing initial help and funding to realize this goal. It will use its resources and influence to extend and promote institutional self-archiving, to launch new open-access journals, and to help an open-access journal system become economically self-sustaining. While the Open Society Institute's commitment and resources are substantial, this initiative is very much in need of other organizations to lend their effort and resources.

We invite governments, universities, libraries, journal editors, publishers, foundations, learned societies, professional associations, and individual scholars who share our vision to join us in the task of removing the barriers to open access and building a future in which research and education in every part of the world are that much more free to flourish.

February 14, 2002
Budapest, Hungary

Leslie Chan: Bioline International
Darius Cuplinskas: Director, Information Program, Open Society Institute
Michael Eisen: Public Library of Science
Fred Friend: Director Scholarly Communication, University College London
Yana Genova: Next Page Foundation
Jean-Claude Guédon: University of Montreal
Melissa Hagemann: Program Officer, Information Program, Open Society Institute
Stevan Harnad: Professor of Cognitive Science, University of Southampton, Universite du Quebec a Montreal
Rick Johnson: Director, Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)
Rima Kupryte: Open Society Institute
Manfredi La Manna: Electronic Society for Social Scientists
István Rév: Open Society Institute, Open Society Archives
Monika Segbert: eIFL Project consultant
Sidnei de Souza: Informatics Director at CRIA, Bioline International
Peter Suber: Professor of Philosophy, Earlham College & The Free Online Scholarship Newsletter
Jan Velterop: Publisher, BioMed Central

2003 Statement: Access to Scientific Information

voltar

 

 


The Glasgow Declaration on Libraries, Information Services and Intellectual Freedom
19 August, 2002

Meeting in Glasgow on the occasion of the 75th anniversary of its formation, the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) declares that:

IFLA proclaims the fundamental right of human beings both to access and to express information without restriction.

IFLA and its worldwide membership support, defend and promote intellectual freedom as expressed in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This intellectual freedom encompasses the wealth of human knowledge, opinion, creative thought and intellectual activity.

IFLA asserts that a commitment to intellectual freedom is a core responsibility of the library and information profession worldwide, expressed through codes of ethics and demonstrated through practice.
IFLA affirms that:

* Libraries and information services provide access to information, ideas and works of imagination in any medium and regardless of frontiers. They serve as gateways to knowledge, thought and culture, offering essential support for independent decision-making, cultural development, research and lifelong learning by both individuals and groups.
* Libraries and information services contribute to the development and maintenance of intellectual freedom and help to safeguard democratic values and universal civil rights. Consequently, they are committed to offering their clients access to relevant resources and services without restriction and to opposing any form of censorship.
* Libraries and information services shall acquire, preserve and make available the widest variety of materials, reflecting the plurality and diversity of society. The selection and availability of library materials and services shall be governed by professional considerations and not by political, moral and religious views.
* Libraries and information services shall make materials, facilities and services equally accessible to all users. There shall be no discrimination for any reason including race, national or ethnic origin, gender or sexual preference, age, disability, religion, or political beliefs.
* Libraries and information services shall protect each user's right to privacy and confidentiality with respect to information sought or received and resources consulted, borrowed, acquired or transmitted.

IFLA therefore calls upon libraries and information services and their staff to uphold and promote the principles of intellectual freedom and to provide uninhibited access to information.

This Declaration was prepared by IFLA/FAIFE.
Approved by the Governing Board of IFLA 27 March 2002, The Hague, Netherlands.

Proclaimed by the Council of IFLA 19 August 2002, Glasgow, Scotland.

Source: http://www.ifla.org/faife/policy/iflastat/gldeclar-e.html

voltar

   

 

 


Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing
June 20, 2003

Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing

Released June 20, 2003

Contents
o Summary of the April 11 meeting
o Definition of open access publication
o Statement of the Institutions and Funding Agencies working group
o Statement of the Libraries & Publishers working group
o Statement of Scientists and Scientific Societies working group
o List of participants

Summary of the April 11, 2003, Meeting on Open Access Publishing

The following statements of principle were drafted during a one-day meeting held on April 11, 2003 at the headquarters of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Chevy Chase, Maryland. The purpose of this document is to stimulate discussion within the biomedical research community on how to proceed, as rapidly as possible, to the widely held goal of providing open access to the primary scientific literature. Our goal was to agree on significant, concrete steps that all relevant parties —the organizations that foster and support scientific research, the scientists that generate the research results, the publishers who facilitate the peer-review and distribution of results of the research, and the scientists, librarians and other who depend on access to this knowledge— can take to promote the rapid and efficient transition to open access publishing.

A list of the attendees is given following the statements of principle; they participated as individuals and not necessarily as representatives of their institutions. Thus, this statement, while reflecting the group consensus, should not be interpreted as carrying the unqualified endorsement of each participant or any position by their institutions.

Our intention is to reconvene an expanded group in a few months to draft a final set of principles that we will then seek to have formally endorsed by funding agencies, scientific societies, publishers, librarians, research institutions and individual scientists as the accepted standard for publication of peer-reviewed reports of original research in the biomedical sciences.

The document is divided into four sections: The first is a working definition of open access publication. This is followed by the reports of three working groups.

Definition of Open Access Publication

An Open Access Publication[1] is one that meets the following two conditions:

1. The author(s) and copyright holder(s) grant(s) to all users a free, irrevocable, worldwide, perpetual right of access to, and a license to copy, use, distribute, transmit and display the work publicly and to make and distribute derivative works, in any digital medium for any responsible purpose, subject to proper attribution of authorship[2], as well as the right to make small numbers of printed copies for their personal use.

2. A complete version of the work and all supplemental materials, including a copy of the permission as stated above, in a suitable standard electronic format is deposited immediately upon initial publication in at least one online repository that is supported by an academic institution, scholarly society, government agency, or other well-established organization that seeks to enable open access, unrestricted distribution, interoperability, and long-term archiving (for the biomedical sciences, PubMed Central is such a repository).

Notes:

1. Open access is a property of individual works, not necessarily journals or publishers.

2. Community standards, rather than copyright law, will continue to provide the mechanism for enforcement of proper attribution and responsible use of the published work, as they do now.

Statement of the Institutions and Funding Agencies Working Group

Our organizations sponsor and nurture scientific research to promote the creation and dissemination of new ideas and knowledge for the public benefit. We recognize that publication of results is an essential part of scientific research and the costs of publication are part of the cost of doing research. We already expect that our faculty and grantees share their ideas and discoveries through publication. This mission is only half-completed if the work is not made as widely available and as useful to society as possible. The Internet has fundamentally changed the practical and economic realities of distributing published scientific knowledge and makes possible substantially increased access.

To realize the benefits of this change requires a corresponding fundamental change in our policies regarding publication by our grantees and faculty:

1. We encourage our faculty/grant recipients to publish their work according to the principles of the open access model, to maximize the access and benefit to scientists, scholars and the public throughout the world.

2. We realize that moving to open and free access, though probably decreasing total costs, may displace some costs to the individual researcher through page charges, or to publishers through decreased revenues, and we pledge to help defray these costs. To this end we agree to help fund the necessary expenses of publication under the open access model of individual papers in peer-reviewed journals (subject to reasonable limits based on market conditions and services provided).

3. We reaffirm the principle that only the intrinsic merit of the work, and not the title of the journal in which a candidate?s work is published, will be considered in appointments, promotions, merit awards or grants.

4. We will regard a record of open access publication as evidence of service to the community, in evaluation of applications for faculty appointments, promotions and grants.

We adopt these policies in the expectation that the publishers of scientific works share our desire to maximize public benefit from scientific knowledge and will view these new policies as they are intended —an opportunity to work together for the benefit of the scientific community and the public.

Statement of the Libraries & Publishers Working Group

We believe that open access will be an essential component of scientific publishing in the future and that works reporting the results of current scientific research should be as openly accessible and freely useable as possible. Libraries and publishers should make every effort to hasten this transition in a fashion that does not disrupt the orderly dissemination of scientific information.

Libraries propose to:

1. Develop and support mechanisms to make the transition to open access publishing and to provide examples of these mechanisms to the community.

2. In our education and outreach activities, give high priority to teaching our users about the benefits of open access publishing and open access journals.

3. List and highlight open access journals in our catalogs and other relevant databases.

Journal publishers propose to:

1. Commit to providing an open access option for any research article published in any of the journals they publish.

2. Declare a specific timetable for transition of journals to open access models.

3. Work with other publishers of open access works and interested parties to develop tools for authors and publishers to facilitate publication of manuscripts in standard electronic formats suitable for archival storage and efficient searching.

4. Ensure that open access models requiring author fees lower barriers to researchers at demonstrated financial disadvantage, particularly those from developing countries.

Statement of Scientists and Scientific Societies Working Group

Scientific research is an interdependent process whereby each experiment is informed by the results of others. The scientists who perform research and the professional societies that represent them have a great interest in ensuring that research results are disseminated as immediately, broadly and effectively as possible. Electronic publication of research results offers the opportunity and the obligation to share research results, ideas and discoveries freely with the scientific community and the public.

Therefore:

1. We endorse the principles of the open access model.

2. We recognize that publishing is a fundamental part of the research process, and the costs of publishing are a fundamental cost of doing research.

3. Scientific societies agree to affirm their strong support for the open access model and their commitment to ultimately achieve open access for all the works they publish. They will share information on the steps they are taking to achieve open access with the community they serve and with others who might benefit from their experience.

4. Scientists agree to manifest their support for open access by selectively publishing in, reviewing for and editing for open access journals and journals that are effectively making the transition to open access.

5. Scientists agree to advocate changes in promotion and tenure evaluation in order to recognize the community contribution of open access publishing and to recognize the intrinsic merit of individual articles without regard to the titles of the journals in which they appear.

6. Scientists and societies agree that education is an indispensable part of achieving open access, and commit to educate their colleagues, members and the public about the importance of open access and why they support it.

List of Participants

Dr. Patrick O. Brown
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Stanford University School of Medicine, and
Public Library of Science

Ms. Diane Cabell
Associate Director
The Berkman Center for Internet & Society
at Harvard Law School

Dr. Aravinda Chakravarti
Director, McKusick-Nathans Institute of
Genetic Medicine at Johns Hopkins
University, and
Editor, Genome Research

Dr. Barbara Cohen
Senior Editor
Public Library of Science

Dr. Tony Delamothe
BMJ Publishing Group
United Kingdom

Dr. Michael Eisen
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab
University of California Berkeley, and
Public Library of Science

Dr. Les Grivell
Programme Manager
European Molecular Biology Organization
Germany

Prof. Jean-Claude Gu?don
Professor of Comparative Literature,
University of Montreal, and
Member of the Information Sub-Board,
Open Society Institute

Dr. R. Scott Hawley
Genetics Society of America

Mr. Richard K. Johnson
Enterprise Director
SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic
Resources Coalition)

Dr. Marc W. Kirschner
Harvard Medical School

Dr. David Lipman
Director, NCBI
National Library of Medicine
National Institutes of Health

Mr. Arnold P. Lutzker
Lutzker & Lutzker, LLP
Outside Counsel for Open Society Institute

Ms. Elizabeth Marincola
Executive Director
The American Society for Cell Biology

Dr. Richard J. Roberts
New England Biolabs

Dr. Gerald M. Rubin
Vice President and Director, Janelia Farm
Research Campus
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Prof. Robert Schloegl
Chair, Task Force on Electronic Publishing
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Germany

Dr. Vivian Siegel
Executive Editor
Public Library of Science

Dr. Anthony D. So
Health Equity Division
The Rockefeller Foundation

Dr. Peter Suber
Professor of Philosophy, Earlham College
Open Access Project Director, Public Knowledge
Senior Researcher, SPARC

Dr. Harold E. Varmus
President, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Chair, Board of Directors, Public Library of Science

Mr. Jan Velterop
Publisher
BioMed Central
United Kingdom

Dr. Mark J. Walport
Director Designate
The Wellcome Trust
United Kingdom

Ms. Linda Watson
Director
Claude Moore Health Sciences Library
University of Virginia Health System

 

voltar

 

 


ACRL Principles and Strategies for the Reform of Scholarly Communication
August 28, 2003
(1)

Scholarly Communication Defined

Scholarly communication is the system through which research and other scholarly writings are created, evaluated for quality, disseminated to the scholarly community, and preserved for future use. The system includes both formal means of communication, such as publication in peer-reviewed journals, and informal channels, such as electronic listservs. This document addresses issues related primarily to the formal system of scholarly communication.

One of the fundamental characteristics of scholarly research is that it is created as a public good to facilitate inquiry and knowledge. A substantial portion of such research is publicly supported, either directly through federally-funded research projects or indirectly through state support of researchers at state higher-education institutions. In addition, the vast majority of scholars develop and disseminate their research with no expectation of direct financial reward.
Scholarly Communication in Crisis

The formal system of scholarly communication is showing numerous signs of stress and crisis. Throughout the second half of the 20th century commercial firms have assumed increasing control over the scholarly journals market, particularly in scientific, technical, and medical fields. The journal publishing industry has also become increasingly consolidated and is now dominated by a small number of international conglomerates. Prices for scholarly journals have risen at rates well above general inflation in the economy and also above the rate of increase of library budgets. Libraries have coped with price increases through a variety of strategies, including subscription cuts and reductions in monographic purchases. In addition, escalating prices have occurred at the same time that the quantity of scholarly information, including the number of scholarly journals, has increased substantially. The net effect of these changes has been a significant reduction in access to scholarship.

The economic challenges facing scholarly monograph publishers, particularly university presses, are another aspect of the growing crisis, one that illustrates its systemic nature. Faced with declining library markets and other economic pressures, university presses have substantially decreased the extent to which they produce specialized scholarly monographs. Such publications have been an important component of scholarly output, particularly in humanistic disciplines.

The recent transition to electronic publishing, though promising in many respects, presents numerous new challenges and threats to access. As journals move from print to electronic form, the legal framework for their use changes from copyright law to contract law. The latter framework governs publisher licensing agreements, which often include undesirable limits on use, eliminating forms of access that would have been permitted in the print environment under principles of fair use. Individual libraries tend to have limited bargaining power in negotiating publisher licensing agreements that provide desired levels of access for users as well as rights for such services as interlibrary loan. Libraries also face loss of content in licensed aggregated journal databases when agreements between publishers and aggregators change.

The electronic environment also poses significant challenges for long-term preservation of, and access to, information. Since most libraries do not actually own and store the content of the journals they license in electronic form, new models for preservation must be developed. Changes in technology platforms pose other serious preservation challenges.

Access to scholarship is further threatened by various issues at the national policy level. Powerful commercial interests have successfully supported - and are continuing to advocate - changes in copyright law that limit the public domain and significantly reduce principles of fair use, particularly for information in digital form. Public policy establishes the legal environment in which publishers and aggregators negotiate licenses with libraries; it can seriously compromise the ability of libraries and library consortia to negotiate licensing terms on an equal footing. National policy has also failed to address consolidation in the journal publishing industry and the price rises that result from publisher mergers.

These issues and trends have reduced access to scholarship. While the severity of problems experienced has varied by both the type of institution involved and its particular circumstances, these issues touch all types of universities and colleges and their libraries. They will continue to adversely affect the system of scholarly communication, unless they are successfully addressed by the higher education community.
The ACRL Scholarly Communications Initiative

The purpose of the Association of College and Research Libraries’ scholarly communications initiative is to work in partnership with other library and higher education organizations to encourage reform in the system of scholarly communication and to broaden the engagement of academic libraries in scholarly communications issues. Goals of the initiative are to create a system of scholarly communication that is more responsive to the needs of the academy, reflecting the nature of scholarship and research as a public good.
Principles Supported

ACRL supports the following principles for reform in the system of scholarly communication:

* the broadest possible access to published research and other scholarly writings
* increased control by scholars and the academy over the system of scholarly publishing
* fair and reasonable prices for scholarly information
* competitive markets for scholarly information
* a diversified publishing industry
* open access to scholarship
* innovations in publishing that reduce distribution costs, speed delivery, and extend access to scholarly research
* quality assurance in publishing through peer review
* fair use of copyrighted information for educational and research purposes
* extension of public domain information
* preservation of scholarly information for long-term future use
* the right to privacy in the use of scholarly information.

Strategies Supported

ACRL supports the following strategies for reform in the system of scholarly communication:

* the development of competitive journals, including the creation of low cost and open access journals that provide direct alternatives to high priced commercial titles
* increased control by editorial boards over the business practices of their journals, which may include negotiating reductions in subscription prices, converting to open access business models, or moving journals to nonprofit publishers, such as university presses, in instances where continued commercial publication does not serve the needs of their scholarly communities
* challenges to journal publisher mergers to prevent increased industry consolidation, especially among publishers of journals in scientific, technical and medical fields, where mergers have resulted in documented opportunistic price increases
* the development of peer-reviewed open access journals, which follow business models that obviate the need for subscriptions or other economic restrictions on access
* federal and private funding of authors’ fees for publishing in open access journals, incorporated as an integral part of the process through which research is funded
* federal legislation that will require that federally funded research published in subscription-based journals be made openly accessible within a specific period of time (e.g. six months) after publication
* the development of institutional repositories (defined as open access sites which capture the research output of a given institution) that are created either by single institutions or by groups of institutions working under a cooperative framework
* the development of disciplinary repositories (open access sites that archive research in a discipline according to principles of open access)
* self-archiving by scholars of their research and writings in open access repositories
* publishing and copyright agreements that allow authors to retain the right to self-archive their peer-reviewed publications in open access repositories
* maintenance of interoperability standards that facilitate efficient access to content in open repositories
* the development of new models and practices that will preserve scholarly information in electronic form for future use
* implementation of public policies that ensure fair use of scholarly information in electronic form
* implementation of public policies that protect the rights and capacities of libraries to provide acceptable terms of user access and reach reasonable economic terms in licensing electronic information
* licensing agreements by library consortia and other groups of libraries that maximize their collective buying and negotiating power
* use of innovative and cost-effective electronic information technologies in publishing, including publication of journals in electronic form and the creation of scholarly electronic communities that serve the needs of scholars in a discipline in flexible ways
* campus advocacy by librarians, faculty, and administrators to create greater awareness for the need for change in the system of scholarly communication
* vigorous national advocacy, in cooperation with other groups, in support of the public policy principles enumerated in this document.

Note:
1 This document, which was developed by the Association of College and Research Libraries Scholarly Communications Committee, is intended to be a foundation statement that provides overall guidance the ACRL scholarly communications initiative. It was approved by the ACRL Board of Directors on June 24, 2003 at the ALA Annual Conference in Toronto.

voltar

 

 


Wellcome Trust position statement on open access
October 1, 2003

Wellcome Trust position statement in support of open access publishing

The mission of the Wellcome Trust is to "foster and promote research with the aim of improving human and animal health." The main output of this research is new ideas and knowledge, which the Trust expects its researchers to publish in quality, peer-reviewed journals.

The Trust has a fundamental interest in ensuring that neither the terms struck with researchers, nor the marketing and distribution strategies used by publishers (whether commercial, not-for-profit or academic) adversely affect the availability and accessibility of this material.

With recent advances in internet publishing, the Trust is aware that there are a number of new models for the publication of research results and will encourage initiatives that broaden the range of opportunities for quality research to be widely disseminated and freely accessed.

The Wellcome Trust therefore supports open and unrestricted access to the published output of research, including the open access model (defined below), as a fundamental part of its charitable mission and a public benefit to be encouraged wherever possible.

Specifically, the Trust:

* welcomes the establishment of free-access, high-quality scientific journals available via the internet
* will encourage and support the formation of such journals and/or free-access repositories for research papers
* will meet the cost of publication charges including those for online-only journals for Trust-funded research by permitting Trust researchers to use contingency funds for this purpose
* encourages researchers to maximise the opportunities to make their results available for free and, where possible, retain their copyright, as recommended by the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), and as practised by BioMed Central, the Public Library of Science, and similar organisations
* affirms the principle that it is the intrinsic merit of the work, and not the title of the journal in which a researcher's work is published, that should be considered in funding decisions and awarding grants

As part of its corporate planning process, the Trust will continue to keep this policy under review.
Definition of open access publication (1)

An open access publication is one that meets the following two conditions:

1. The author(s) and copyright holder(s) grant(s) to all users a free, irrevocable, worldwide, perpetual (for the lifetime of the applicable copyright) right of access to, and a licence to copy, use, distribute, perform and display the work publicly and to make and distribute derivative works in any digital medium for any reasonable purpose, subject to proper attribution of authorshi(2), as well as the right to make small numbers of printed copies for their personal use.

2. A complete version of the work and all supplemental materials, including a copy of the permission as stated above, in a suitable standard electronic format is deposited immediately upon initial publication in at least one online repository that is supported by an academic institution, scholarly society, government agency, or other well-established organisation that seeks to enable open access, unrestricted distribution, interoperability, and long-term archiving (for the biomedical sciences, PubMed Central is such a repository).

Notes:

The definition of open access publication used in this position statement is based on the definition arrived at by delegates who attended a meeting on open access publishing convened by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in July 2003.

The Trust commissioned SQW economic and management consultants to undertake an economic analysis of the scientific publishing market, which helped to inform this position statement. View the Economic Analysis of Scientific Research report.

SQW were commissioned to undertake a second report entitled Costs and Business Models in Scientific Research Publishing.

1 An open access publication is a property of individual works, not necessarily of journals or of publishers.

2 Community standards, rather than copyright law, will continue to provide the mechanism for enforcement of proper attribution and responsible use of the published work, as they do now.

See also:
Economic Analysis of Scientific Research
Costs and Business Models in Scientific Research Publishing


voltar

 

 


An IAP Statement on Access to Scientific Information
Mexico City, 4 December 2003

The truth that knowledge is power is particularly emphasized in today's world.
Science is the most successful means of knowledge creation. Because it deals exclusively with arguments based on evidence that can be independently confirmed by others, science is by its very nature an endeavour that requires openness, and it thrives on a complete and honest public reporting of results. Access to the vast and varied literature that has been generated by scientific research, and to the numerical data that are being collected in public research endeavours, is essential to advances in human health, improvements in agriculture, and the preservation of the natural environment that sustains our life. It is also critical for the creation of new technologies that benefit humankind. In addition, scientific knowledge facilitates our understanding of our place in the universe.
Yet most scientists and research laboratories in developing countries cannot afford the journal subscriptions, or have to pay for access to the databases that exist in more economically advanced nations. All nations must have access to the accumulation of scientific knowledge in order to work toward a better future for all people.

In an era in which global dissemination of the published results of scientific research is increasingly accomplished electronically, it is possible to give access to this body of knowledge to scientists worldwide, allowing them to participate in the scientific process and advance the scientific enterprise. Access to current, high quality, scientific databases and literature allows scientists in developing countries to base their own work on up-to-date advancements in their field and to strengthen the scientific infrastructure of their own countries. Unfortunately, however, scientists and research institutions in the developing world can rarely afford the high cost of these knowledge resources.
The InterAcademy Panel on International Issues (IAP), recognizing that many efforts in this regard are under way worldwide and that the business models of scientific publishers need to be taken into consideration, recommends that:
1/. electronic access to journal content be made available worldwide without cost as soon as possible, within one year or less of publication for scientists in industrialized nations, and immediately upon publication for scientists in developing countries;
2/. journal content and, to the extent possible, data upon which research is based, be prepared and presented in a standard format for electronic distribution to facilitate ease of use;
3/. journal content be archived collectively, either by private or government organizations;
4/. governments and publishers work together to raise awareness, in the scientific community, of the availability of free electronic access to scientific journals;
5/. scientific databases obtained by intergovernmental organizations (for example in meteorology and epidemiology) be made available without cost or restrictions on reuse.
For both the publishers of scientific journals and the intergovernmental organizations, providing free content to developing countries will have a minimal financial impact. Sales to these countries are small compared to the revenue generated from sales to more developed countries. Moreover, the cost of implementing the technology for custom web access for selected countries is low (for details, see: http://www.nap.edu/info/free_ip.html).

We, the undersigned science academies throughout the world, members of the IAP, are convinced that, with the support of international authorities, the backing of the ministries concerned, and the cooperation of scientific publishers, worldwide dissemination of scientific knowledge can be achieved; and that the benefits to the global scientific community, and to developing countries in particular, will be immense.


Access to Scientific Information: Signatories

Latin American Academy of Sciences
Third World Academy of Sciences
Albanian Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Exact, Physical and Natural Sciences, Argentina
Australian Academy of Science
Austrian Academy of Sciences
Bangladesh Academy of Sciences
The Royal Academies for Science and the Arts of Belgium
Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Brazilian Academy of Sciences
Cameroon Academy of Sciences
The Royal Society of Canada
Academia Chilena de Ciencias
Chinese Academy of Sciences
Academia Sinica, China, Taiwan
Colombian Academy of Exact, Physical and Natural Sciences
Croatian Academy of Arts and Sciences
Cuban Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
Academy of Scientific Research and Technology, Egypt
Estonian Academy of Sciences
The Delegation of the Finnish Academies of Science and Letters
Académie des Sciences, France
Georgian Academy of Sciences
Union of German Academies of Sciences and Humanities
Ghana Academy of Arts and Sciences
Academy of Athens, Greece
Academia de Ciencias Medicas, Fisicas y Naturales de Guatemala
Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Indian National Science Academy
Indonesian Academy of Sciences
Royal Irish Academy (Acadamh Ríoga na héireann)
Kenya National Academy of Sciences
Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, Italy
Science Council of Japan
Royal Scientific Society of Jordan
African Academy of Sciences
Latvian Academy of Sciences
Lithuanian Academy of Sciences
Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts
Akademi Sains Malaysia
Academía Mexicana de Ciencias
Academy of Sciences of Moldova
Mongolian Academy of Sciences
The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences
Academy Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand
Nigerian Academy of Sciences
Norwegian Academy of Sciences and Letters
Pakistan Academy of Sciences
Palestine Academy for Science and Technology
Academia Nacional de Ciencias del Peru
National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines
Russian Academy of Sciences
Académie des Sciences et Techniques du Sénégal
Slovak Academy of Sciences
Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts
Academy of Science of South Africa
Royal Academy of Exact, Physical and Natural Sciences of Spain
National Academy of Sciences, Sri Lanka
Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
Council of the Swiss Scientific Academies
Academy of Sciences, Republic of Tajikistan
The Caribbean Academy of Sciences
Turkish Academy of Sciences
The Royal Society, United Kingdom
US National Academy of Sciences
Academia de Ciencias Físicas, Matemáticas y Naturales de Venezuela

 

voltar

 

 


La Declaración de Berlín sobre acceso abierto

El siguiente es el texto de la versión autorizada al español*  de  la  "Declaración de Berlín",  aprobada  el  22 de octubre de 2003, por representantes de varias instituciones europeas, convocados por la Sociedad Max Planck:


Prefacio

        La Internet  ha  cambiado  fundamentalmente  las  realidades  prácticas  y  económicas relacionadas  con  la  distribución  del  conocimiento  científico  y el patrimonio cultural.  Por  primera  vez   en  todos  los  tiempos,   la Internet nos ofrece la oportunidad de construir  una  representación global e interactiva del conocimiento humano, incluyendo el patrimonio cultural,  y la perspectiva de acceso a escala mundial.

        Quienes firmamos este documento, nos sentimos obligados  a considear los retos de la Internet como medio funcional emergente para la distribución del conocimiento. Obviamente, estos desarrollos podrán modificar de manera significativa la naturaleza de hacer la publicación científica, lo mismo que el actual sistema de certificación de la calidad.

        En concordancia con el espíritu de la  Declaración de la Iniciativa sobre Acceso Abierto de Budapest,  la Carta de ECHO y la Declaración de Bethesda sobre Publicación para Acceso Abierto,  hemos  redactado  la  Declaración de Berlín  para  promover  la  Internet  como  el instrumento  funcional  que  sirva  de  base  global  del conocimiento científico y la reflexión humana,  y para especificar medidas que deben ser tomadas en cuenta por los encargados de las políticas de investigación,  y por las instituciones científicas,  agencias de financiamiento, bibliotecas, archivos y museos.


Metas

        Nuestra misión de diseminar el conocimiento  será  incompleta  si la información no es puesta a disposición de la sociedad de manera expedita y amplia. Es necesario apoyar  nuevas posibilidades de diseminación del conocimiento,  no  solo  a  través de la manera clásica, sino también  utilizando  el  paradigma  del  acceso abierto por medio de la Internet.  Definimos el acceso  abierto  como  una  amplia  fuente  de  conocimiento  humano  y  patrimonio cultural aprobada por la comunidad científica.

        Para  que  se  pueda  alcanzar la visión de una representación del conocimiento global y accesible,  la Web del futuro tiene que ser sustentable, interactiva y transparente.  El contenido y las herramientas de software deben ser libremente accesibles y compatibles.


Definición de una contribución de acceso abierto

        Para  establecer  el  acceso  abierto  como  un  procedimiento  meritorio,  se requiere idealmente  el  compromiso  activo  de  todos  y cada uno de quienes producen conocimiento científico y mantienen el patrimonio cultural.   Las contribuciones del acceso abierto incluyen los resultados de la investigación científica original,  datos primarios y metadatos,  materiales fuentes,  representaciones  digitales de materiales gráficos y pictóricos,  y  materiales eruditos en multimedia.

        Las contribuciones de acceso abierto deben satisfacer dos condiciones:

       1. El(los) autor(es)  y  depositario(s)  de  la propiedad intelectual de tales contribuciones deben garantizar a todos los usuarios por igual,  el derecho gratuito, irrevocable y mundial de acceder  a  un trabajo erudito,  lo mismo  que  licencia  para  copiarlo,  usarlo,  distribuirlo,  transmitirlo y exhibirlo públicamente, y para hacer y distribuir trabajos derivativos, en cualquier medio digital para cualquier  propósito responsable,  todo sujeto al reconocimiento apropiado de autoría (los estándares de la comunidad continuarán proveyendo  los  mecanismos  para  hacer cumplir el reconocimiento apropiado y uso responsable de las obras publicadas, como ahora se hace), lo mismo que el derecho de efectuar copias impresas en pequeño número para su uso personal.

       2. Una versión completa del trabajo y todos sus materiales complementarios, que  incluya una copia del permiso del que se habla arriba, en un conveniente formato electrónico estándar, se deposita  (y así es publicado)  en por lo menos un repositorio online, que utilice estándares técnicos  aceptables   (tales como las definiciones del  acceso abierto),   que  sea  apoyado y mantenido por una institución académica,  sociedad erudita,  agencia  gubernamental,  o una bien establecida organización que busque la implementación del acceso abierto,  distribución irrestricta, interoperabilidad y capacidad archivística a largo plazo.


Apoyo de la transición al paradigma del acceso abierto electrónico

Nuestras organizaciones tienen interés en la mayor promoción del nuevo paradigma del acceso abierto  para  obtener  el  máximo  beneficio  para  la  ciencia y la sociedad.  En consecuencia, intentamos progresar en este empeño

•estimulando  a  nuestros  investigadores/beneficiarios  de  ayuda  a  publicar sus trabajos de acuerdo con los principios del paradigma del acceso abierto.

•estimulando a los depositarios del patrimonio cultural  para que apoyen el acceso abierto distribuyendo sus recursos a través de la Internet.

•desarrollando medios y maneras de evaluar  las  contribuciones de acceso abierto y las revistas electrónicas, para mantener estándares de garantía de calidad y práctica científica sana.

•abogando  porque  la  publicación  en  acceso  abierto  sea  reconocida  como factor de evaluazión para efectos de ascensos y tenencia académica.

•reclamando  el  mérito  intrínseco  de  las contribuciones a una infraestructura de acceso abierto mediante el desarrollo de herramientas de software, provisión de contenido, creación de metadatos, o la publicación de artículos individuales.

        Nos  damos  cuenta  de  que  el  proceso  de  desplazarse  al  acceso  abierto cambia la diseminación de conocimiento en lo que respecta a cuestiones legales y financieras. Nuestras organizaciones  tienen  el propósito de encontrar soluciones que ayuden a un mayor desarrollo de los marcos legales y financieros existentes, con el fin de facilitar óptimo uso y acceso.


Febrero 14, 2002.
Budapest, Hungría

Leslie Chan: Bioline International
Darius Cuplinskas: Director, Information Program, Open Society Institute
Michael Eisen: Public Library of Science
Fred Friend: Director Scholarly Communication, University College London
Yana Genova: Next Page Foundation
Jean-Claude Guédon: University of Montreal
Melissa Hagemann: Program Officer, Information Program, Open Society Institute
Stevan Harnad: Professor of Cognitive Science, University of Southampton, Universite du Quebec a Montreal
Rick Johnson: Director, Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)
Rima Kupryte: Open Society Institute
Manfredi La Manna: Electronic Society for Social Scientists
István Rév: Open Society Institute, Open Society Archives
Monika Segbert: eIFL Project consultant
Sidnei de Souza: Informatics Director at CRIA, Bioline International
Peter Suber: Professor of Philosophy, Earlham College & The Free Online Scholarship Newsletter
Jan Velterop: Publisher, BioMed Central


A la Iniciativa de Acceso Abierto de Budapest han adherido numerosas entidades e individuos. Su institución, y Usted mismo, pueden suscribir la declaración original en cualquier momento. Haga clic en la siguiente URL para este efecto: http://www.soros.org/openaccess.sign.shtml .


voltar

 

 



UN World Summit on the Information Society - Declaration of Principles and Plan of Action
Cumbre Mundial sobre la Sociedade de la Información - Declaración de Principios

December 12, 2003

Construir la Sociedad de la Información:
un desafío global para el nuevo milenio

A Nuestra visión común de la Sociedad de la Información

1 Nosotros, los representantes de los pueblos del mundo, reunidos en Ginebra del 10 al 12 de diciembre de 2003 con motivo de la primera fase de la Cumbre Mundial sobre la Sociedad de la Información, declaramos nuestro deseo y compromiso comunes de construir una Sociedad de la Información centrada en la persona, integradora y orientada al desarrollo, en que todos puedan crear, consultar, utilizar y compartir la información y el conocimiento, para que las personas, las comunidades y los pueblos puedan emplear plenamente sus posibilidades en la promoción de su desarrollo sostenible y en la mejora de su calidad de vida, sobre la base de los propósitos y principios de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas y respetando plenamente y defendiendo la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos.

2 Nuestro desafío es encauzar el potencial de la tecnología de la información y la comunicación para promover los objetivos de desarrollo de la Declaración del Milenio, a saber, erradicar la pobreza extrema y el hambre, instaurar la enseñanza primaria universal, promover la igualdad de género y la autonomía de la mujer, reducir la mortalidad infantil, mejorar la salud materna, combatir el VIH/SIDA, el paludismo y otras enfermedades, garantizar la sostenibilidad del medio ambiente y fomentar asociaciones mundiales para el desarrollo que permitan forjar un mundo más pacífico, justo y próspero. Reiteramos asimismo nuestro compromiso con la consecución del desarrollo sostenible y los objetivos de desarrollo acordados, que se señalan en la Declaración y el Plan de Aplicación de Johannesburgo y en el Consenso de Monterrey, y otros resultados de las Cumbres pertinentes de las Naciones Unidas.

3 Reafirmamos la universalidad, indivisibilidad, interdependencia e interrelación de todos los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales, incluido el derecho al desarrollo, tal como se consagran en la Declaración de Viena. Reafirmamos asimismo que la democracia, el desarrollo sostenible y el respeto de los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales, así como el buen gobierno a todos los niveles, son interdependientes y se refuerzan entre sí. Estamos además determinados a reforzar el respeto del imperio de la ley en los asuntos internacionales y nacionales.

4 Reafirmamos, como fundamento esencial de la Sociedad de la Información, y según se estipula en el Artículo 19 de la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos, que todo individuo tiene derecho a la libertad de opinión y de expresión, que este derecho incluye el de no ser molestado a causa de sus opiniones, el de investigar y recibir información y opiniones, y el de difundirlas, sin limitación de fronteras, por cualquier medio de expresión. La comunicación es un proceso social fundamental, una necesidad humana básica y el fundamento de toda organización social. Constituye el eje central de la Sociedad de la Información. Todas las personas, en todas partes, deben tener la oportunidad de participar, y nadie debería quedar excluido de los beneficios que ofrece la Sociedad de la Información.

5 Reafirmamos nuestro compromiso con lo dispuesto en el Artículo 29 de la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos, a saber, que toda persona tiene deberes respecto a la comunidad, puesto que sólo en ella puede desarrollar libre y plenamente su personalidad, y que, en el ejercicio de sus derechos y en el disfrute de sus libertades, toda persona estará solamente sujeta a las limitaciones establecidas por la ley con el único fin de asegurar el reconocimiento y el respeto de los derechos y libertades de los demás, y de satisfacer las justas exigencias de la moral, del orden público y del bienestar general en una sociedad democrática. Estos derechos y libertades no podrán en ningún caso ser ejercidos en oposición a los propósitos y principios de las Naciones Unidas. De esta manera, fomentaremos una Sociedad de la Información en la que se respete la dignidad humana.

6 De conformidad con el espíritu de la presente Declaración, reafirmamos nuestro empeño en defender el principio de la igualdad soberana de todos los Estados.

7 Reconocemos que la ciencia desempeña un papel cardinal en el desarrollo de la Sociedad de la Información. Gran parte de los elementos constitutivos de esta sociedad son el fruto de los avances científicos y técnicos que han sido posibles gracias a la comunicación mutua de los resultados de la investigación.

8 Reconocemos que la educación, el conocimiento, la información y la comunicación son esenciales para el progreso, la iniciativa y el bienestar de los seres humanos. Es más, las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones (TIC) tienen inmensas repercusiones en prácticamente todos los aspectos de nuestras vidas. El rápido progreso de estas tecnologías brinda oportunidades sin precedentes para alcanzar niveles más elevados de desarrollo. La capacidad de las TIC para reducir muchos obstáculos tradicionales, especialmente el tiempo y la distancia, posibilitan, por primera vez en la historia, el uso del potencial de estas tecnologías en beneficio de millones de personas en todo el mundo.

9 Somos conscientes de que las TIC deben considerarse un medio, y no un fin en sí mismas. En condiciones favorables, estas tecnologías pueden ser un instrumento eficaz para acrecentar la productividad, generar crecimiento económico, crear empleos y fomentar la ocupabilidad, así como mejorar la calidad de la vida de todos. Pueden, además, promover el diálogo entre las personas, las naciones y las civilizaciones.

10 Somos plenamente conscientes de que las ventajas de la revolución de la tecnología de la información están en la actualidad desigualmente distribuidas entre los países desarrollados y en desarrollo, así como dentro de las sociedades. Estamos plenamente comprometidos a convertir la brecha digital en una oportunidad digital para todos, especialmente aquellos que corren peligro de quedar rezagados y aún más marginados.

11 Estamos empeñados en materializar nuestra visión común de la Sociedad de la Información, para nosotros y las generaciones futuras. Reconocemos que los jóvenes constituyen la fuerza de trabajo del futuro, son los principales creadores de las TIC y también los primeros que las adoptan. En consecuencia, deben fomentarse sus capacidades como estudiantes, desarrolladores, contribuyentes, empresarios y encargados de la adopción toma de decisiones. Debemos centrarnos especialmente en los jóvenes que no han tenido aún la posibilidad de aprovechar plenamente las oportunidades que brindan las TIC. También estamos comprometidos a garantizar que, en el desarrollo de las aplicaciones y la explotación de los servicios de las TIC, se respeten los derechos de los niños y se vele por su protección y su bienestar.

12 Afirmamos que el desarrollo de las TIC brinda ingentes oportunidades a las mujeres, las cuales deben ser parte integrante y participantes clave de la Sociedad de la Información. Nos comprometemos a garantizar que la Sociedad de la Información fomente la potenciación de las mujeres y su plena participación, en pie de igualdad, en todas las esferas de la sociedad y en todos los procesos de adopción de decisiones. A dicho efecto, debemos integrar una perspectiva de igualdad de género y utilizar las TIC como un instrumento para conseguir este objetivo.

13 Al construir la Sociedad de la Información prestaremos especial atención a las necesidades especiales de los grupos marginados y vulnerables de la sociedad, en particular los migrantes, las personas internamente desplazadas y los refugiados, los desempleados y las personas desfavorecidas, las minorías y las poblaciones nómadas. Reconoceremos, por otra parte, las necesidades especiales de personas de edad y las personas con discapacidades.

14 Estamos resueltos a potenciar a los pobres, especialmente los que viven en zonas distantes, rurales y urbanas marginadas, para acceder a la información y utilizar las TIC como instrumento de apoyo a sus esfuerzos para salir de la pobreza.

15 En la evolución de la Sociedad de la Información, se debe prestar particular atención a la situación especial de los pueblos indígenas, así como a la preservación de su legado y su patrimonio cultural.

16 Seguimos concediendo especial atención a las necesidades particulares de los habitantes de los países en desarrollo, los países con economías en transición, los países menos adelantados, los pequeños países insulares en desarrollo, los países en desarrollo sin litoral, los países pobres muy endeudados, los países y territorios ocupados, los países que se están recuperando de conflictos y los países y regiones con necesidades especiales, así como a las situaciones que plantean amenazas graves al desarrollo, tales como las catástrofes naturales.

17 Reconocemos que la construcción de una Sociedad de la Información integradora requiere nuevas modalidades de solidaridad, asociación y cooperación entre los gobiernos y demás partes interesadas, es decir, el sector privado, la sociedad civil y las organizaciones internacionales. Reconociendo que el ambicioso objetivo de la presente Declaración -colmar la brecha digital y garantizar un desarrollo armonioso, justo y equitativo para todos- exigirá un compromiso sólido de todas las partes interesadas, hacemos un llamamiento a la solidaridad digital, en los planos nacional e internacional.

18 Nada en la presente Declaración podrá interpretarse en un sentido en que menoscabe, contradiga, restrinja o derogue las disposiciones de la Carta de las Naciones Unidas y la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos, de ningún otro instrumento internacional o de las leyes nacionales adoptadas de conformidad con esos instrumentos.

B Una Sociedad de la Información para todos: principios fundamentales

19 Estamos decididos a proseguir nuestra búsqueda para garantizar que las oportunidades que ofrecen las TIC redunden en beneficio de todos. Estamos de acuerdo en que, para responder a tales desafíos, todas las partes interesadas deberían colaborar para ampliar el acceso a la infraestructura y las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones, así como a la información y al conocimiento; fomentar la capacidad; reforzar la confianza y la seguridad en la utilización de las TIC; crear un entorno propicio a todos los niveles; desarrollar y ampliar las aplicaciones TIC; promover y respetar la diversidad cultural; reconocer el papel de los medios de comunicación; abordar las dimensiones éticas de la Sociedad de la Información; y alentar la cooperación internacional y regional. Acordamos que éstos son los principios fundamentales de la construcción de una Sociedad de la Información integradora.

1) La función de los gobiernos y de todas las partes interesadas en la promoción de las TIC para el desarrollo

20 Los gobiernos, al igual que el sector privado, la sociedad civil, las Naciones Unidas y otras organizaciones internacionales, tienen una función y una responsabilidad importantes en el desarrollo de la Sociedad de la Información y, en su caso, en el proceso de toma de decisiones. La construcción de una Sociedad de la Información centrada en la persona es un esfuerzo conjunto que necesita la cooperación y la asociación de todas las partes interesadas.

2) Infraestructura de la información y las comunicaciones: fundamento básico de una Sociedad de la Información integradora

21 La conectividad es un factor habilitador indispensable en la creación de la Sociedad de la Información. El acceso universal, ubicuo, equitativo y asequible a la infraestructura y los servicios de las TIC constituye uno de los retos de la Sociedad de la Información y debe ser un objetivo de todos las partes interesadas que participan en su creación. La conectividad también abarca el acceso a la energía y a los servicios postales, que debe garantizarse de conformidad con la legislación nacional de cada país.

22 Una infraestructura de red y aplicaciones de las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones, que estén bien desarrolladas, adaptadas a las condiciones regionales, nacionales y locales, fácilmente accesibles y asequibles y que, de ser posible, utilicen en mayor medida la banda ancha y otras tecnologías innovadoras, puede acelerar el progreso económico y social de los países, así como el bienestar de todas las personas, comunidades y pueblos.

23 Se deberían desarrollar y aplicar políticas que creen un clima favorable para la estabilidad, previsibilidad y competencia leal a todos los niveles, de tal forma que se atraiga más inversión privada para el desarrollo de infraestructura de TIC, y que al mismo tiempo permita atender al cumplimiento de las obligaciones del servicio universal en regiones en que las condiciones tradicionales del mercado no funcionen correctamente. En las zonas desfavorecidas, el establecimiento de puntos de acceso público a las TIC en lugares como oficinas de correos, escuelas, bibliotecas y archivos, puede ser el medio eficaz de garantizar el acceso universal a la infraestructura y los servicios de la Sociedad de la Información.

3) Acceso a la información y al conocimiento

24 La capacidad universal de acceder y contribuir a la información, las ideas y el conocimiento es un elemento indispensable en una Sociedad de la Información integradora.

25 Es posible promover el intercambio y el fortalecimiento de los conocimientos mundiales en favor del desarrollo si se eliminan los obstáculos que impiden un acceso equitativo a la información para actividades económicas, sociales, políticas, sanitarias, culturales, educativas y científicas, y si se facilita el acceso a la información que está en el dominio público, lo que incluye el diseño universal y la utilización de tecnologías auxiliares.

26 Un dominio público rico es un factor esencial del crecimiento de la Sociedad de la Información, ya que genera ventajas múltiples tales como un público instruido, nuevos empleos, innovación, oportunidades comerciales y el avance de las ciencias. La información del dominio público debe ser fácilmente accesible en apoyo de la Sociedad de la Información, y debe estar protegida de toda apropiación indebida. Habría que fortalecer las instituciones públicas tales como bibliotecas y archivos, museos, colecciones culturales y otros puntos de acceso comunitario, para promover la preservación de las constancias documentales y el acceso libre y equitativo a la información.

27 Se puede fomentar el acceso a la información y al conocimiento sensibilizando a todas las partes interesadas de las posibilidades que brindan los diferentes modelos de software, lo que incluye software protegido, de fuente abierta y software libre, para acrecentar la competencia, el acceso de los usuarios y la diversidad de opciones, y permitir que todos los usuarios desarrollen las soluciones que mejor se ajustan a sus necesidades. El acceso asequible al software debe considerarse como un componente importante de una Sociedad de la Información verdaderamente integradora.

28 Nos esforzamos en promover el acceso universal, con las mismas oportunidades para todos, al conocimiento científico y la creación y divulgación de información científica y técnica, con inclusión de las iniciativas de acceso abierto para las publicaciones científicas.

4) Creación de capacidad

29 Cada persona debería tener la posibilidad de adquirir las competencias y los conocimientos necesarios para comprender la Sociedad de la Información y la economía del conocimiento, participar activamente en ellas y aprovechar plenamente sus beneficios. La alfabetización y la educación primaria universal son factores esenciales para crear una Sociedad de la Información plenamente integradora, teniendo en cuenta en particular las necesidades especiales de las niñas y las mujeres. A la vista de la amplia gama de especialistas en las TIC y la información que son necesarios a todos los niveles, debe prestarse particular atención a la creación de capacidades institucionales.

30 Debe promoverse el empleo de las TIC en todos los niveles de la educación, la formación y el desarrollo de los recursos humanos, teniendo en cuenta las necesidades particulares de las personas con discapacidades y los grupos desfavorecidos y vulnerables.

31 La educación continua y de adultos, la formación en otras disciplinas y el aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida, la enseñanza a distancia y otros servicios especiales, tales como la telemedicina, pueden ser una contribución clave para la ocupabilidad y ayudar a las personas a aprovechar las nuevas posibilidades que ofrecen las TIC para los empleos tradicionales, el trabajo por cuenta propia y las nuevas profesiones. En este sentido, la sensibilización y la alfabetización en el ámbito de las TIC son un sustento fundamental.

32 Los creadores, editores y productores de contenido, así como los profesores, instructores, archivistas, bibliotecarios y estudiantes deben desempeñar una función activa en la promoción de la Sociedad de la Información, particularmente en los países menos adelantados.

33 Para alcanzar un desarrollo sostenible de la Sociedad de la Información debe reforzarse la capacidad nacional en materia de investigación y desarrollo de TIC. Por otro lado, las asociaciones, en particular entre países desarrollados y países en desarrollo, incluidos los países con economías en transición, con fines de investigación y desarrollo, transferencia de tecnología, fabricación y utilización de los productos y servicios TIC, son indispensables para la promoción de la creación de capacidad y una participación mundial en la Sociedad de la Información. La fabricación de productos de TIC ofrece una excelente oportunidad de creación de riqueza.

34 El logro de nuestras aspiraciones compartidas, particularmente para que los países en desarrollo y los países con economías en transición se conviertan en miembros plenos de la Sociedad de la Información e integrarnos positivamente en la economía del conocimiento, depende en gran parte de que se impulse el fomento de la capacidad en las esferas de la educación, los conocimientos tecnológicos y el acceso a la información, que son factores determinantes para el desarrollo y la competitividad.

5) Fomento de la confianza y seguridad en la utilización de las TIC

35 El fomento de un clima de confianza, incluso en la seguridad de la información y la seguridad de las redes, la autenticación, la privacidad y la protección de los consumidores, es requisito previo para que se desarrolle la Sociedad de la Información y para promover la confianza entre los usuarios de las TIC. Se debe fomentar, desarrollar y poner en práctica una cultura global de ciberseguridad, en cooperación con todas las partes interesadas y los organismos internacionales especializados. Se deberían respaldar dichos esfuerzos con una mayor cooperación internacional. Dentro de esta cultura global de ciberseguridad, es importante mejorar la seguridad y garantizar la protección de los datos y la privacidad, al mismo tiempo que se amplía el acceso y el comercio. Por otra parte, es necesario tener en cuenta el nivel de desarrollo social y económico de cada país, y respetar los aspectos de la Sociedad de la Información orientados al desarrollo.

36 Si bien se reconocen los principios de acceso universal y sin discriminación a las TIC para todas las naciones, apoyamos las actividades de las Naciones Unidas encaminadas a impedir que se utilicen estas tecnologías con fines incompatibles con el mantenimiento de la estabilidad y seguridad internacionales, y que podrían menoscabar la integridad de las infraestructuras nacionales, en detrimento de su seguridad. Es necesario evitar que las tecnologías y los recursos de la información se utilicen para fines criminales o terroristas, respetando siempre los derechos humanos.

37 El envío masivo de mensajes electrónicos no solicitados ("spam") es un problema considerable y creciente para los usuarios, las redes e Internet en general. Conviene abordar los problemas de la ciberseguridad y "spam" en los planos nacional e internacional, según proceda.

6) Entorno propicio

38 Un entorno propicio a nivel nacional e internacional es indispensable para la Sociedad de la Información. Las TIC deben utilizarse como una herramienta importante del buen gobierno.

39 El estado de derecho, acompañado por un marco de política y reglamentación propicio, transparente, favorable a la competencia, tecnológicamente neutro, predecible y que refleje las realidades nacionales, es insoslayable para construir una Sociedad de la Información centrada en la persona. Los gobiernos deben intervenir, según proceda, para corregir los fallos del mercado, mantener una competencia leal, atraer inversiones, intensificar el desarrollo de infraestructura y aplicaciones de las TIC, aumentar al máximo los beneficios económicos y sociales y atender a las prioridades nacionales.

40 Un entorno internacional dinámico y propicio, que favorezca la inversión extranjera directa, la transferencia de tecnología y la cooperación internacional, sobre todo en las esferas de las finanzas, la deuda y el comercio, así como la participación plena y eficaz de los países en desarrollo en la toma de decisiones a escala mundial son complementos fundamentales a los esfuerzos de desarrollo nacional relacionados con las TIC. Una conectividad mundial más asequible contribuiría de manera apreciable a la eficacia de estos esfuerzos encaminados al desarrollo.

41 Las TIC son un importante factor que propicia el crecimiento, ya que mejoran la eficacia e incrementan la productividad, especialmente en las pequeñas y medianas empresas (PYME). Por esta razón, el desarrollo de la Sociedad de la Información es importante para lograr un crecimiento económico general en las economías desarrolladas y en desarrollo. Se deben fomentar la mejora de la productividad por medio de las TIC y la aplicación de la innovación en todos los sectores económicos. La distribución equitativa de los beneficios contribuye a la erradicación de la pobreza y al desarrollo social. Las políticas más eficaces son probablemente las que fomentan la inversión productiva y permiten a las empresas, en particular a las PYME, efectuar los cambios necesarios para aprovechar los beneficios de las TIC.

42 La protección de la propiedad intelectual es importante para alentar la innovación y la creatividad en la Sociedad de la Información, así como también lo son una amplia divulgación, difusión e intercambio de los conocimientos. El fomento de una verdadera participación de todos en las cuestiones de propiedad intelectual e intercambio de conocimientos, mediante la sensibilización y la creación de capacidades, es un componente esencial de una Sociedad de la Información integradora.

43 La mejor forma de promover el desarrollo sostenible en la Sociedad de la Información consiste en integrar plenamente los programas e iniciativas relacionadas con las TIC en las estrategias de desarrollo nacionales y regionales. Acogemos con beneplácito la Nueva Asociación para el Desarrollo de África (NEPAD) y alentamos a la comunidad internacional a apoyar las medidas que se adopten en el marco de esta iniciativa en relación con las TIC, así como las desplegadas en el marco de esfuerzos similares en otras regiones. La distribución de los beneficios resultantes del mayor crecimiento impulsado por las TIC contribuye a la erradicación de la pobreza y a un desarrollo sostenible.

44 La normalización es uno de los componentes esenciales de la Sociedad de la Información. Conviene hacer especial hincapié en la elaboración y aprobación de normas internacionales. El desarrollo y empleo de normas abiertas, compatibles, no discriminatorias e impulsadas por la demanda, que tengan en cuenta las necesidades de los usuarios y los consumidores, es un factor básico para el desarrollo y la mayor propagación de las TIC, así como de un acceso más asequible a las mismas, sobre todo en los países en desarrollo. A través de la normalización internacional se busca crear un entorno en el cual los consumidores tengan acceso a servicios en todo el mundo, independientemente de la tecnología subyacente.

45 El espectro de frecuencias radioeléctricas debe gestionarse en favor del interés público y de conformidad con el principio de legalidad, respetando cabalmente las legislaciones y reglamentaciones nacionales, así como los acuerdos internacionales pertinentes.

46 Se insta enérgicamente a los Estados a que, en la construcción de la Sociedad de la Información, tomen las disposiciones necesarias para evitar, y se abstengan de adoptar, medidas unilaterales no conformes con el derecho internacional y con la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, que impidan la plena consecución del desarrollo económico y social de la población de los países afectados, y que menoscaben el bienestar de sus ciudadanos.

47 Reconociendo que las TIC están modificando progresivamente nuestras prácticas de trabajo, es indispensable crear un entorno de trabajo seguro y sano que sea adecuado para la utilización de las TIC, conforme con las normas internacionales pertinentes.

48 Internet se ha convertido en un recurso global disponible para el público, y su gestión debe ser una de las cuestiones esenciales del programa de la Sociedad de la Información. La gestión internacional de Internet debe ser multilateral, transparente y democrática, y contar con la plena participación de los gobiernos, el sector privado, la sociedad civil y las organizaciones internacionales. Esta gestión debería garantizar la distribución equitativa de recursos, facilitar el acceso a todos y garantizar un funcionamiento estable y seguro de Internet, teniendo en cuenta el plurilingüismo.

49 La gestión de Internet abarca cuestiones técnicas y de política pública y debe contar con la participación de todas las partes interesadas y de organizaciones internacionales e intergubernamentales competentes. A este respecto se reconoce que:

a) la autoridad de política en materia de política pública relacionada con Internet es un derecho soberano de los Estados. Ellos tienen derechos y responsabilidades en las cuestiones de política pública internacional relacionadas con Internet;

b) el sector privado ha desempeñado, y debe seguir desempeñando, un importante papel en el desarrollo de Internet, en los campos técnico y económico;

c) la sociedad civil también ha desempeñado, y debe seguir desempeñando, un importante papel en asuntos relacionados con Internet, especialmente a nivel comunitario;

d) las organizaciones intergubernamentales han desempeñado, y deben seguir desempeñando, un papel de facilitador en la coordinación de las cuestiones de política pública relacionadas con Internet;

e) las organizaciones internacionales han desempeñado, y deben seguir desempeñando, una importante función en la elaboración de normas técnicas y políticas pertinentes relativas a Internet.

50 Las cuestiones de un gobierno internacional de Internet deben abordarse de manera coordinada. Solicitamos al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas que establezca un Grupo de trabajo sobre el gobierno de Internet, en un proceso abierto e integrador que garantice un mecanismo para la participación plena y activa de los gobiernos, el sector privado y la sociedad civil de los países desarrollados y en desarrollo, con inclusión de las organizaciones y foros intergubernamentales e internacionales relevantes, a fin de investigar y formular propuestas de acción, según el caso, sobre el gobierno de Internet antes de 2005.

7) Aplicaciones de las TIC: beneficios en todos los aspectos de la vida

51 En la utilización y despliegue de las TIC se debe tratar de generar beneficios en todos los ámbitos de nuestra vida cotidiana. Las aplicaciones TIC son potencialmente importantes para las actividades y servicios gubernamentales, la atención y la información sanitaria, la educación y la capacitación, el empleo, la creación de empleos, la actividad económica, la agricultura, el transporte, la protección del medio ambiente y la gestión de los recursos naturales, la prevención de catástrofes y la vida cultural, así como para fomentar la erradicación de la pobreza y otros objetivos de desarrollo acordados. Las TIC también deben contribuir al establecimiento de pautas de producción y consumo sostenibles y a reducir los obstáculos tradicionales, ofreciendo a todos la oportunidad de acceder a los mercados nacionales y mundiales de manera más equitativa. Las aplicaciones deben ser fáciles de utilizar, accesibles para todos, asequibles, adaptadas a las necesidades locales en materia de idioma y cultura, y favorables al desarrollo sostenible. A dicho efecto, las autoridades locales deben desempeñar una importante función en el suministro de servicios TIC en beneficio de sus poblaciones.

8) Diversidad e identidad culturales, diversidad lingüística y contenido local

52 La diversidad cultural es el patrimonio común de la humanidad. La Sociedad de la Información debe fundarse en el reconocimiento y respeto de la identidad cultural, la diversidad cultural y lingüística, las tradiciones y las religiones, además de promover un diálogo entre las culturas y las civilizaciones. La promoción, la afirmación y preservación de los diversos idiomas e identidades culturales, tal como se consagran en los correspondientes documentos acordados por las Naciones Unidas, incluida la Declaración Universal de la UNESCO sobre la Diversidad Cultural, contribuirán a enriquecer aún más la Sociedad de la Información.

53 La creación, difusión y preservación de contenido en varios idiomas y formatos deben considerarse altamente prioritarias en la construcción de una Sociedad de la Información integradora, prestándose particular atención a la diversidad de la oferta de obras creativas y el debido reconocimiento de los derechos de los autores y artistas. Es esencial promover la producción de todo tipo de contenidos, sean educativos, científicos, culturales o recreativos, en diferentes idiomas y formatos, y la accesibilidad a esos contenidos. La creación de contenido local que se ajuste a las necesidades nacionales o regionales alentará el desarrollo económico y social y estimulará la participación de todas las partes interesadas, entre ellas, los habitantes de zonas rurales, distantes y marginadas.

54 La preservación del patrimonio cultural es un elemento crucial de la identidad del individuo y del conocimiento de sí mismo, y a su vez enlaza a una comunidad con su pasado. La Sociedad de la Información debe aprovechar y preservar el patrimonio cultural para el futuro, mediante la utilización de todos los métodos adecuados, entre otros, la digitalización.

9) Medios de comunicación

55 Reafirmamos nuestra adhesión a los principios de libertad de la prensa y libertad de la información, así como la independencia, el pluralismo y la diversidad de los medios de comunicación, que son esenciales para la Sociedad de la Información. También es importante la libertad de buscar, recibir, difundir y utilizar la información para la creación, recopilación y divulgación del conocimiento. Abogamos por que los medios de comunicación utilicen y traten la información de manera responsable, de acuerdo con los principios éticos y profesionales más rigurosos. Los medios de comunicación tradicionales, en todas sus formas, tienen un importante papel que desempeñar en la Sociedad de la Información, y las TIC deben servir de apoyo a este respecto. Debe fomentarse la diversidad de regímenes de propiedad de los medios de comunicación, de acuerdo con la legislación nacional y habida cuenta de los convenios internacionales pertinentes. Reafirmamos la necesidad de reducir los desequilibrios internacionales que afectan a los medios de comunicación, en particular en lo que respecta a la infraestructura, los recursos técnicos y el desarrollo de capacidades humanas.

10) Dimensiones éticas de la Sociedad de la Información

56 La Sociedad de la Información debe respetar la paz y regirse por los valores fundamentales de libertad, igualdad, solidaridad, tolerancia, responsabilidad compartida y respeto a la naturaleza.

57 Reconocemos la importancia de la ética para la Sociedad de la Información, que debe fomentar la justicia, así como la dignidad y el valor de la persona humana. Se debe acordar la protección más amplia posible a la familia y permitir que ésta desempeñe su papel cardinal en la sociedad.

58 El uso de las TIC y la creación de contenidos debería respetar los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales de otros, lo que incluye la privacidad personal y el derecho a la libertad de opinión, conciencia y religión de conformidad con los instrumentos internacionales relevantes.

59 Todos los actores de la Sociedad de la Información deben adoptar las acciones y medidas preventivas apropiadas, con arreglo al derecho, para impedir la utilización abusiva de las TIC, tales como actos ilícitos o de otro tipo motivados por el racismo, la discriminación racial, la xenofobia, y las formas conexas de intolerancia, el odio, la violencia , todo tipo de maltrato de niños, incluidas la pedofilia y la pornografía infantil, así como la trata y la explotación de seres humanos.

11) Cooperación internacional y regional

60 Nuestro objetivo es aprovechar plenamente las oportunidades que ofrecen las TIC en nuestros esfuerzos por alcanzar los objetivos de desarrollo convenidos internacionalmente, incluidos los que figuran en la Declaración del Milenio, y sostener los principios fundamentales que establece la presente Declaración. La Sociedad de la Información es por naturaleza intrínsecamente global y los esfuerzos nacionales deben ser respaldados por una cooperación eficaz, a nivel internacional y regional entre los gobiernos, el sector privado, la sociedad civil y las demás partes interesadas, entre ellas, las instituciones financieras internacionales.

61 A fin de construir una Sociedad de la Información global integradora, buscaremos e instrumentaremos de manera eficaz los enfoques y mecanismos internacionales concretos, lo que abarca la asistencia financiera y técnica. Por tanto, al mismo tiempo que apreciamos la cooperación actual en materia de TIC a través de diversos mecanismos, invitamos a todas las partes interesadas a manifestar su adhesión a la " Agenda de la Solidaridad Digital" establecida en el Plan de Acción. Estamos persuadidos de que el objetivo convenido a nivel mundial es el de contribuir a colmar la brecha digital, promover el acceso a las TIC, crear oportunidades digitales y aprovechar los posibles beneficios que las TIC ofrecen para el desarrollo. Reconocemos la voluntad expresada por algunos, de crear un "Fondo de la Solidaridad Digital" internacional de carácter voluntario, y por otros, de emprender estudios relativos a los mecanismos existentes y a la eficacia y viabilidad de dicho Fondo.

62 La integración regional contribuye al desarrollo de la Sociedad de la Información global y hace indispensable la cooperación intensa entre las regiones y dentro de ellas. El diálogo regional debe contribuir a la creación de capacidades a nivel nacional y a la armonización de las estrategias nacionales, de manera compatible con los objetivos de la presente Declaración de Principios, respetando las particularidades nacionales y regionales. En ese sentido, acogemos con beneplácito las medidas relacionadas con las TIC que forman parte de esas iniciativas, y alentamos a la comunidad internacional a apoyarlas.

63 Estamos resueltos a asistir a los países en desarrollo, a los PMA y a los países con economías en transición, mediante la movilización de todas las fuentes de financiamiento, la prestación de asistencia financiera y técnica y la creación de un entorno propicio para la transferencia de tecnología, en consonancia con los propósitos de la presente Declaración y el Plan de Acción.

64 Las competencias básicas de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones (UIT) en el campo de las TIC, a saber, la asistencia para colmar la brecha digital, la cooperación regional e internacional, la gestión del espectro radioeléctrico, la elaboración de normas y la difusión de información, revisten crucial importancia en la construcción de la Sociedad de la Información.

C Hacia una Sociedad de la Información para todos, basada en el intercambio de conocimientos

65 Nos comprometemos a colaborar más intensamente para definir respuestas comunes a los problemas que se planteen y a la aplicación del Plan de Acción, que materializará la visión de una Sociedad de la Información integradora, sobre la base de los principios fundamentales recogidos en la presente Declaración.

66 Nos comprometemos asimismo a evaluar y a seguir de cerca los progresos hacia la reducción de la brecha digital, teniendo en cuenta los diferentes niveles de desarrollo, con miras a lograr los objetivos de desarrollo internacionalmente acordados, incluidos los que figuran en la Declaración del Milenio, y a evaluar la eficacia de la inversión y los esfuerzos de cooperación internacional encaminados a la construcción de la Sociedad de la Información.

67 Tenemos la firme convicción de que estamos entrando colectivamente en una nueva era que ofrece enormes posibilidades, la era de la Sociedad de la Información y de una mayor comunicación humana. En esta sociedad incipiente es posible generar, intercambiar, compartir y comunicar información y conocimiento entre todas las redes del mundo. Si tomamos las medidas necesarias, pronto todos los individuos podrán juntos construir una nueva Sociedad de la Información basada en el intercambio de conocimientos y asentada en la solidaridad mundial y un mejor entendimiento mutuo entre los pueblos y las naciones. Confiamos en que estas medidas abran la vía hacia el futuro desarrollo de una verdadera sociedad del conocimiento.

Plan de Acción

A. Introducción

1 En el presente Plan de Acción la visión común y los principios fundamentales de la Declaración de Principios se traducen en líneas de acción concretas para alcanzar los objetivos de desarrollo acordados a nivel internacional, con inclusión de los consignados en la Declaración del Milenio, el Consenso de Monterrey y la Declaración y el Plan de Aplicación de Johannesburgo, mediante el fomento del uso de productos, redes, servicios y aplicaciones basados en las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones (TIC), y para ayudar a los países a superar la brecha digital. La Sociedad de la Información que se prevé en la Declaración de Principios se realizará de forma cooperativa y solidaria con los gobiernos y todas las demás partes interesadas.

2 La Sociedad de la Información es un concepto en plena evolución, que ha alcanzado en el mundo diferentes niveles, como reflejo de diferentes etapas de desarrollo. Los cambios tecnológicos y de otro tipo están transformando rápidamente el entorno en que se desarrolla la Sociedad de la Información. El Plan de Acción constituye, pues, una plataforma dinámica para promover la Sociedad de la Información en los planos nacional, regional e internacional. La estructura peculiar de la Cumbre Mundial sobre la Sociedad de la Información (CMSI), en dos fases, permite recoger esta evolución.

3 Todas las partes interesadas pueden prestar una contribución importante en la Sociedad de la Información, especialmente a través de asociaciones:

a) A los gobiernos incumbe la función de dirigir la formulación y aplicación de ciberestrategias nacionales exhaustivas, orientadas al futuro y sostenibles. El sector privado y la sociedad civil, en diálogo con los gobiernos, tienen una importante función consultiva en la formulación de esas ciberestrategias nacionales.

b) La aportación del sector privado es importante para el desarrollo y la difusión de las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones (TIC) en ámbitos como infraestructura, contenido y aplicaciones. El sector privado no es sólo un actor del mercado, sino que desempeña un papel en el contexto más amplio de desarrollo sostenible.

c) El compromiso y la participación de la sociedad civil es igualmente importante en la creación de una Sociedad de la Información equitativa y en la instrumentación de las iniciativas para el desarrollo relacionadas con las TIC.

d) Las instituciones internacionales y regionales, incluidas las instituciones financieras internacionales, desempeñan un papel clave a la hora de integrar la utilización de las TIC en el proceso de desarrollo y proporcionar los recursos necesarios para construir la Sociedad de la Información y evaluar los progresos alcanzados.

B. Objetivos y metas

4 Los objetivos del Plan de Acción son construir una Sociedad de la Información integradora, poner el potencial del conocimiento y las TIC al servicio del desarrollo, fomentar la utilización de la información y del conocimiento para la consecución de los objetivos de desarrollo acordados internacionalmente, incluidos los contenidos en la Declaración del Milenio, y hacer frente a los nuevos desafíos que plantea la Sociedad de la Información en los planos nacional, regional e internacional. En la segunda fase de la CMSI se tendrá la oportunidad de evaluar los avances hacia la reducción de la brecha digital.

5 Se establecerán, según proceda, objetivos concretos de la Sociedad de la Información en el plano nacional, en el marco de las ciberestrategias nacionales y de conformidad con las políticas de desarrollo nacionales, teniendo en cuenta las circunstancias de cada país. Dichos objetivos pueden servir de puntos de referencia útiles para las actividades y la evaluación de los progresos realizados en la consecución de los objetivos globales de la Sociedad de la Información.

6 Sobre la base de los objetivos de desarrollo acordados internacionalmente, entre ellos, los que figuran en la Declaración del Milenio, que suponen la cooperación internacional, se establecen algunos objetivos indicativos, que pueden servir de referencia mundial para mejorar la conectividad y el acceso a las TIC, a fin de promover los objetivos del Plan de Acción, y que deben alcanzarse antes de 2015. Estos objetivos pueden tenerse en cuenta cuando se fijen las metas nacionales, en función de las circunstancias de cada país:

a) utilizar las TIC para conectar aldeas, y crear puntos de acceso comunitario;

b) utilizar las TIC para conectar a universidades, escuelas superiores, escuelas secundarias y escuelas primarias;

c) utilizar las TIC para conectar centros científicos y de investigación;

d) utilizar las TIC para conectar bibliotecas públicas, centros culturales, museos, oficinas de correos y archivos;

e) utilizar las TIC para conectar centros sanitarios y hospitales;

f) conectar los departamentos de gobierno locales y centrales y crear sitios web y direcciones de correo electrónico;

g) adaptar todos los programas de estudio de la enseñanza primaria y secundaria al cumplimiento de los objetivos de la Sociedad de la Información, teniendo en cuenta las circunstancias de cada país;

h) asegurar que todos los habitantes del mundo tengan acceso a servicios de televisión y radio;

i) fomentar el desarrollo de contenidos e implantar condiciones técnicas que faciliten la presencia y la utilización de todos los idiomas del mundo en Internet;

j) asegurar que el acceso a las TIC esté al alcance de más de la mitad de los habitantes del planeta.

7 En el cumplimiento de estos objetivos y metas, se prestará especial atención a las necesidades de los países en desarrollo y, en particular, de los países, poblaciones y grupos mencionados en los párrafos 11 a 16 de la Declaración de Principios.

C. Líneas de acción

C1. Papel de los gobiernos y de todas las partes interesadas en la promoción de
las TIC para el desarrollo

8 La participación efectiva de los gobiernos y de todas las partes interesadas es indispensable para el desarrollo de la Sociedad de la Información, que requiere la cooperación y asociación entre todos ellos.

a) Se debe alentar a la formulación, antes de 2005, de ciberestrategias nacionales, que incluyan la creación de las capacidades humanas necesarias, teniendo en cuenta las circunstancias peculiares de cada país.

b) Iniciar, a nivel nacional, un diálogo coordinado entre todas las partes interesadas pertinentes, por ejemplo, a través de asociaciones entre los sectores público y privado, para elaborar ciberestrategias para la Sociedad de la Información e intercambiar prácticas óptimas .

c) En la formulación y aplicación de las ciberestrategias nacionales, las partes interesadas deberían tener en cuenta las necesidades y preocupaciones locales, regionales y nacionales. Para optimizar los beneficios de las iniciativas emprendidas, éstas deben incluir el concepto de sostenibilidad. Se debe lograr que el sector privado participe en proyectos concretos de desarrollo de la Sociedad de la Información en los planos local, regional y nacional.

d) Se alienta a cada país a establecer, antes de 2005, por lo menos una asociación funcional de los sectores público y privado o multisectorial, como ejemplo visible para las actividades futuras.

e) Identificar en los planos nacional, regional e internacional, mecanismos para iniciar y promover la asociación entre las partes interesadas en la Sociedad de la Información.

f) Estudiar la viabilidad de establecer en el plano nacional portales para los pueblos indígenas, con la participación de múltiples partes interesadas.

g) Antes de 2005, las organizaciones internacionales y las instituciones financieras pertinentes deberían elaborar sus propias estrategias de utilización de las TIC para el desarrollo sostenible, lo que incluye pautas de producción y consumo sostenibles, y como instrumento eficaz para contribuir al logro de los objetivos establecidos en la Declaración del Milenio de las Naciones Unidas.

h) Las organizaciones internacionales, en sus esferas de competencia, deberían publicar, incluso en sus sitios web, la información fiable que presenten las correspondientes partes interesadas sobre sus experiencias satisfactorias en la utilización de las TIC.

i) Se debería alentar a la adopción de una serie de medidas conexas que incluyan, entre otras cosas, programas de incubadoras, inversiones de capital riesgo (nacionales e internacionales), fondos de inversión gubernamental (incluidos la microfinanciación para pequeñas, medianas y microempresas), estrategias de promoción de inversiones, actividades de apoyo a la exportación de software (asesoría comercial), respaldo de redes de investigación y desarrollo y parques de software.

C2. Infraestructura de la información y la comunicación: fundamento básico para la Sociedad de la información

9 La infraestructura es fundamental para alcanzar el objetivo de la integración en el ámbito digital, propicia el acceso universal, sostenible, ubicuo y asequible a las TIC para todos, teniendo en cuenta las soluciones pertinentes ya aplicadas en los países en desarrollo y en los países con economías en transición para ofrecer conectividad y acceso a zonas distantes y marginadas en los ámbitos regional y nacional.

a) En el marco de sus políticas nacionales de desarrollo, los gobiernos deberían tomar medidas en apoyo de un entorno propicio y competitivo que favorezca la inversión necesaria en infraestructura de TIC y para desarrollar nuevos servicios.

b) En el contexto de las ciberestrategias nacionales, deberían concebir políticas y estrategias adecuadas de acceso universal, y los medios necesarios para su aplicación, con arreglo a las metas indicativas, y definir indicadores de conectividad a las TIC.

c) En el contexto de las ciberestrategias nacionales, deberían proporcionar y mejorar la conectividad a las TIC en todas las escuelas, universidades, instituciones sanitarias, bibliotecas, oficinas de correos, centros comunitarios, museos y otras instituciones accesibles al público, conforme a las metas indicativas.

d) Deberían desarrollar y fortalecer la infraestructura de redes de banda ancha nacionales, regionales e internacionales, con inclusión de los sistemas por satélite y otros sistemas que contribuyan a crear la capacidad necesaria para ajustar la satisfacción de las necesidades de los países y de sus ciudadanos con la prestación de nuevos servicios basados en las TIC. Deberían apoyar los estudios técnicos, de reglamentación y operacionales de la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones (UIT) y, en su caso, los de otras organizaciones internacionales competentes, a fin de:

i) ampliar el acceso a los recursos de las órbitas, la armonización mundial de las frecuencias y la normalización de los sistemas a nivel mundial;

ii) fomentar las asociaciones entre el sector público y el privado;

iii) promover la prestación de servicios mundiales de satélite a gran velocidad a zonas desatendidas, como las zonas distantes y con poblaciones dispersas;

iv) investigar otros sistemas que puedan proporcionar conectividad a gran velocidad.

e) En el contexto de las ciberestrategias nacionales, deberían abordar las necesidades especiales de las personas de edad avanzada, las personas con discapacidades, los niños especialmente los niños marginados, y otros grupos desfavorecidos y vulnerables, incluso a través de medidas educativas, administrativas y legislativas adecuadas para garantizar su plena integración en la Sociedad de la Información.

f) Deberían fomentar el diseño y la fabricación de equipos y servicios de las TIC para que todos tengan un acceso fácil y asequible, incluidas las personas de edad, las personas con discapacidades, los niños, especialmente los niños marginados, y otros grupos desfavorecidos y vulnerables, y promover el desarrollo de tecnologías, aplicaciones y contenido adecuadas a sus necesidades, guiándose por el principio del diseño universal y mejorándolos mediante la utilización de tecnologías auxiliares.

g) Con el objetivo de atenuar los problemas que plantea el analfabetismo, se deberían diseñar tecnologías asequibles e interfaces informáticas sin texto para facilitar el acceso de las personas a las TIC.

h) Realizar esfuerzos de investigación y desarrollo en el plano internacional con miras a poner equipo adecuado y asequible de TIC a disposición de los usuarios finales.

i) Alentar el empleo de la capacidad no utilizada de comunicaciones inalámbricas, incluidos los sistemas por satélites, en los países desarrollados y en particular en los países en desarrollo, para dar acceso a zonas distantes, especialmente en países en desarrollo y países con economías en transición, y mejorar la conectividad de bajo costo en los países en desarrollo. Debería prestarse especial atención a los países menos adelantados, en sus esfuerzos por establecer una infraestructura de telecomunicaciones.

j) Optimizar la conectividad entre las principales redes de información, fomentando la creación y el desarrollo de redes troncales de TIC y centrales de Internet regionales, a fin de reducir los costos de interconexión y ampliar el acceso a la red.

k) Definir estrategias para aumentar la conectividad global a precios asequibles, facilitando con ello un mejor acceso. Los costos de tránsito e interconexión de Internet que resulten de negociaciones comerciales deben orientarse hacia parámetros objetivos, transparentes y no discriminatorios, teniendo en cuenta la labor en curso sobre el tema.

l) Alentar y promover el uso conjunto de los medios de comunicación tradicionales y las nuevas tecnologías.

C3. Acceso a la información y al conocimiento

10 Las TIC permiten a la población tener acceso a la información y al conocimiento en cualquier lugar del mundo y de manera prácticamente instantánea. Todas las personas, organizaciones y comunidades deberían tener acceso al conocimiento y la información.

a) Definir directrices políticas para el desarrollo y promoción de la información en el dominio público, como un importante instrumento internacional que promueve el acceso de todos a la información.

b) Se alienta a los gobiernos a proporcionar acceso adecuado a la información oficial pública mediante diversos recursos de comunicación, especialmente por Internet. Se alienta también a la elaboración de una legislación relativa al acceso a la información y la preservación de los datos públicos, especialmente en el campo de las nuevas tecnologías.

c) Promover la investigación y el desarrollo para facilitar el acceso de todos a las TIC, con inclusión de los grupos desfavorecidos, marginados y vulnerables.

d) Los gobiernos y otras partes interesadas deben establecer centros comunitarios polivalentes de acceso público y sostenibles, que proporcionen a sus ciudadanos un acceso asequible o gratuito a diversos servicios de comunicación, y especialmente a Internet. En la medida de lo posible, dichos centros de acceso deben tener capacidad suficiente para proporcionar asistencia a los usuarios, en bibliotecas, instituciones educativas, administraciones públicas, oficinas de correos u otros lugares públicos, haciéndose especial hincapié en las zonas rurales y desatendidas, al tiempo que se respetan los derechos de propiedad intelectual y se fomenta la utilización de la información y el intercambio del conocimiento.

e) Estimular la investigación y sensibilizar a todas las partes interesadas acerca de las posibilidades que ofrecen los distintos modelos de software , y sus procesos de creación, lo que incluye software protegido , de fuente abierta y software libre , con el fin de ampliar la competencia, la libertad de elección, y la asequibilidad, y permitir que todas las partes interesadas evalúen las soluciones que mejor se adapten a sus necesidades.

f) Los gobiernos deben promover activamente el uso de las TIC como una herramienta fundamental de trabajo de sus ciudadanos y autoridades locales. A este respecto, la comunidad internacional y las demás partes interesadas deben respaldar la creación de capacidades de las autoridades locales para generalizar la utilización de las TIC, como medio para mejorar la administración local.

g) Fomentar la investigación sobre la Sociedad de la Información, incluso acerca de formas innovadoras de trabajo en redes, adaptación de la infraestructura, herramientas y aplicaciones de las TIC que faciliten el acceso de todos, y en particular, de los grupos desfavorecidos, a esas tecnologías.

h) Respaldar la creación y el desarrollo de una biblioteca pública digital y servicios de archivos, adaptados a la Sociedad de la Información, entre otras cosas, revisando las estrategias y legislaciones nacionales sobre bibliotecas, elaborando un entendimiento mundial sobre la necesidad de "bibliotecas híbridas" y fomentando la cooperación mundial entre las bibliotecas.

i) Alentar las iniciativas que faciliten el acceso, incluido el acceso gratuito y a precios asequibles, a las publicaciones periódicas y libros de acceso abierto, y a los archivos abiertos que contienen información científica.

j) Apoyar la investigación y el desarrollo sobre el diseño de instrumentos útiles para todas las partes interesadas, que fomenten la sensibilización y evaluación de los distintos modelos y licencias de software , a fin de asegurar una elección óptima de los programas más adecuados que contribuyan mejor a alcanzar las metas de desarrollo, considerando las condiciones locales.

C4. Creación de capacidad

11 Todos deben tener las aptitudes necesarias para aprovechar plenamente los beneficios de la Sociedad de la Información. Por consiguiente, la creación de capacidad y la adquisición de conocimientos sobre las TIC son esenciales. Las TIC pueden contribuir a la consecución de la enseñanza universal, a través de la enseñanza y la formación de profesores, y la oferta de mejores condiciones para el aprendizaje continuo, que abarquen a las personas que están al margen de la enseñanza oficial, y el perfeccionamiento de las aptitudes profesionales.

a) Definir políticas nacionales para garantizar la plena integración de las TIC en todos los niveles educativos y de capacitación, incluyendo la elaboración de planes de estudio, la formación de los profesores, la gestión y administración de las instituciones, y el apoyo al concepto del aprendizaje a lo largo de toda la vida.

b) Preparar y promover programas para erradicar el analfabetismo, utilizando las TIC en los ámbitos nacional, regional e internacional.

c) Promover aptitudes de alfabetización electrónica para todos, por ejemplo, elaborando y ofreciendo cursos de administración pública, aprovechando las instalaciones existentes, tales como bibliotecas, centros comunitarios polivalentes o puntos de acceso público, y estableciendo centros locales de capacitación en el uso de las TIC, con la cooperación de todas las partes interesadas. Debe prestarse especial atención a los grupos desfavorecidos y vulnerables.

d) En el contexto de las políticas educativas nacionales, y tomando en cuenta la necesidad de erradicar el analfabetismo de los adultos, velar por que los jóvenes dispongan de los conocimientos y aptitudes necesarios para utilizar las TIC, incluida la capacidad de analizar y tratar la información de manera creativa e innovadora, y de intercambiar su experiencia y participar plenamente en la Sociedad de la Información.

e) Los gobiernos, en cooperación con otras partes interesadas, deben elaborar programas para crear capacidades, con miras a alcanzar una masa crítica de profesionales y expertos en TIC capacitados y especializados.

f) Elaborar proyectos piloto para demostrar el efecto de los sistemas de enseñanza alternativos basados en las TIC, especialmente para lograr los objetivos de la Educación para todos, incluidas las metas de la alfabetización básica.

g) Procurar eliminar los obstáculos de género que dificultan la educación y la formación en materia de TIC, y promover la igualdad de oportunidades de capacitación para las mujeres y niñas en los ámbitos relacionados con las TIC. Se debe incluir a las niñas entre los programas de iniciación temprana a las ciencias y tecnología, para aumentar el número de mujeres en las carreras relacionadas con las TIC. Promover el intercambio de prácticas óptimas en la integración de las cuestiones de género en la enseñanza de las TIC.

h) Fomentar las capacidades de las comunidades locales, especialmente en las zonas rurales y desatendidas, en la utilización de las TIC y promover la producción de contenido útil y socialmente significativo en provecho de todos.

i) Emprender programas de educación y capacitación que ofrezcan oportunidades para participar plenamente en la Sociedad de la Información, utilizando en lo posible las redes de información de los pueblos nómadas e indígenas tradicionales.

j) Diseñar y realizar actividades de cooperación regional e internacional para mejorar la capacidad, en especial, de los dirigentes y del personal operativo en los países en desarrollo y los PMA, para que apliquen eficazmente las TIC en toda la gama de tareas educativas. Esto debe incluir impartir la enseñanza fuera del sistema de enseñanza oficial, por ejemplo, en el trabajo y el hogar.

k) Diseñar programas específicos de capacitación en el uso de las TIC para atender las necesidades educativas de los profesionales de la información, tales como archivistas, bibliotecarios, profesionales de museos, científicos, maestros, periodistas, trabajadores de correos y otros grupos profesionales pertinentes. La formación de los profesionales de la información no se debe centrar sólo en los nuevos métodos y técnicas para la creación y la prestación de servicios de información y comunicación, sino también en las capacidades administrativas apropiadas para asegurar el mejor uso de estas tecnologías. La capacitación de los docentes debe centrarse en los aspectos técnicos de las TIC, en la elaboración de contenido y en las oportunidades y dificultades potenciales de estas tecnologías.

l) Desarrollar sistemas de enseñanza, capacitación y otras formas de educación y formación a distancia en el marco de programas de creación de capacidad. Prestar especial atención a los países en desarrollo, y en particular a los PMA, en los distintos niveles del desarrollo de los recursos humanos.

m) Promover la cooperación internacional y regional para la creación de capacidad, lo que incluye los programas nacionales establecidos por las Naciones Unidas y sus organismos especializados.

n) Emprender proyectos piloto para definir nuevas formas de trabajo en red basadas en la utilización de las TIC, que conecten las instituciones educativas, de capacitación e investigación de los países desarrollados, los países en desarrollo y los países con economías en transición.

o) El trabajo del voluntariado, si se lleva a cabo en armonía con la política nacional y la cultura local, puede ser un activo valioso para promover la capacidad humana en el uso productivo de los instrumentos de TIC, y para construir una Sociedad de la Información más integradora. Activar programas de voluntariado para contribuir a la creación de capacidad en el ámbito de las TIC para el desarrollo, particularmente en los países en desarrollo.

p) Diseñar programas que capaciten a los usuarios para desarrollar las capacidades de autoaprendizaje y desarrollo personal.

C5. Creación de confianza y seguridad en la utilización de las TIC

12 La confianza y la seguridad son unos de los pilares más importantes de la Sociedad de la Información.

a) Propiciar la cooperación entre los gobiernos dentro de las Naciones Unidas, y con todas las partes interesadas en otros foros apropiados, para aumentar la confianza del usuario y proteger los datos y la integridad de la red; considerar los riesgos actuales y potenciales para las TIC, y abordar otras cuestiones de seguridad de la información y de las redes.

b) Los gobiernos, en cooperación con el sector privado, deben prevenir, detectar, y responder a la ciberdelincuencia y el uso indebido de las TIC, definiendo directrices que tengan en cuenta los esfuerzos existentes en estos ámbitos; estudiando una legislación que permita investigar y juzgar efectivamente la utilización indebida; promoviendo esfuerzos efectivos de asistencia mutua; reforzando el apoyo institucional a nivel internacional para la prevención, detección y recuperación de estos incidentes; y alentando la educación y la sensibilización.

c) Los gobiernos y otras partes interesadas deben fomentar activamente la educación y la sensibilización de los usuarios sobre la privacidad en línea y los medios de protección de la privacidad.

d) Tomar medidas apropiadas contra el envío masivo de mensajes electrónicos no solicitados ("spam") a nivel nacional e internacional.

e) Alentar una evaluación interna de la legislación nacional con miras a superar cualquier obstáculo al uso efectivo de documentos y transacciones electrónicas, incluido los medios electrónicos de autenticación.

f) Seguir fortaleciendo el marco de confianza y seguridad con iniciativas complementarias y de apoyo mutuo en los ámbitos de la seguridad en el uso de las TIC, con iniciativas o directrices sobre el derecho a la privacidad y la protección de los datos y de los consumidores.

g) Compartir prácticas óptimas en el ámbito de la seguridad de la información y la seguridad de las redes, y propiciar su utilización por todas las partes interesadas.

h) Invitar a los países interesados a establecer puntos de contacto para intervenir y resolver incidentes en tiempo real, y desarrollar una red cooperativa entre estos puntos de contacto de forma que se comparta información y tecnologías para intervenir en caso de estos incidentes.

i) Alentar el desarrollo de nuevas aplicaciones seguras y fiables que faciliten las transacciones en línea.

j) Alentar a los países interesados a que contribuyan activamente en las actividades en curso de las Naciones Unidas tendentes a crear confianza y seguridad en la utilización de las TIC.

C6. Entorno habilitador

13 Para maximizar los beneficios sociales, económicos y medioambientales de la Sociedad de la Información, los gobiernos deben crear un entorno jurídico, reglamentario y político fiable, transparente y no discriminatorio. Entre las medidas que pueden adoptarse figuran las siguientes:

a) Los gobiernos deben fomentar un marco político, jurídico y reglamentario propicio, transparente, favorable a la competencia y predecible, que ofrezca los incentivos apropiados para la inversión y el desarrollo comunitario en la Sociedad de la Información.

b) Solicitamos al Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas que establezca un grupo de trabajo sobre el gobierno de Internet, en un proceso abierto e integrador que garantice un mecanismo para la participación plena y activa de los gobiernos, el sector privado y la sociedad civil de los países desarrollados y en desarrollo, con inclusión de las organizaciones y foros internacionales e intergubernamentales pertinentes, a fin de investigar y formular propuestas de acción, según el caso, sobre el gobierno de Internet antes de 2005. El Grupo debe, entre otras cosas:

i) elaborar una definición de trabajo del gobierno de Internet;

ii) identificar las cuestiones de política pública que sean pertinentes para el gobierno de Internet;

iii) desarrollar una comprensión común de los respectivos papeles y responsabilidades de los gobiernos, las organizaciones intergubernamentales e internacionales existentes y otros foros, así como el sector privado y la sociedad civil de los países en desarrollo y los países desarrollados;

iv) preparar un Informe sobre los resultados de esta actividad, que se someterá a la consideración de la segunda fase de la CMSI que se celebrará en Túnez en 2005, para que ésta tome las medidas del caso.

c) Se invita a los gobiernos a:

i) facilitar la creación de centrales de Internet nacionales y regionales;

ii) dirigir o supervisar, llegado el caso, sus respectivos nombres de dominio de nivel superior de código de país (ccTLD);

iii) promover la sensibilización sobre Internet.

d) En cooperación con las partes interesadas pertinentes, fomentar servidores primarios regionales y la utilización de nombres de dominio internacionales a fin de superar los obstáculos al acceso.

e) Los gobiernos deben seguir actualizando su legislación nacional de protección del consumidor para responder a las nuevas necesidades de la Sociedad de la Información.

f) Promover la participación efectiva de los países en desarrollo y de los países con economías en transición en los foros internacionales sobre las TIC, y crear oportunidades para el intercambio de experiencias.

g) Los gobiernos deben formular estrategias nacionales que comprendan estrategias de gobierno electrónico, para que la administración pública sea más transparente, eficaz y democrática.

h) Definir mecanismos seguros para el almacenamiento y el archivo de los documentos y otros registros electrónicos de información.

i) Los gobiernos y las partes interesadas deben promover activamente la educación y la sensibilización de los usuarios en cuanto a la privacidad en línea y los medios para proteger la privacidad.

j) Invitar a las partes interesadas a garantizar que las prácticas encaminadas a facilitar el comercio electrónico permitan también que los consumidores puedan optar por utilizar o no la comunicación electrónica.

k) Alentar el trabajo en curso sobre sistemas eficaces de solución de controversias, especialmente sobre la solución alternativa de controversias, que pueden facilitar la solución de diferencias.

l) Se alienta a los gobiernos a que, en colaboración con las partes interesadas, definan políticas de las TIC que propicien la actividad empresarial, la innovación y la inversión, haciendo especial hincapié en la promoción de la participación de la mujer.

m) Habida cuenta del potencial económico que las TIC representan para las pequeñas y medianas empresas (PYME), se les debe prestar asistencia para que aumenten su competitividad, agilizando los procedimientos administrativos, facilitando su acceso al capital y mejorando su capacidad de participar en proyectos de TIC.

n) Los gobiernos deben servir de modelo en el uso del comercio electrónico, y adoptarlo lo más pronto posible, en función de su nivel de desarrollo socioeconómico.

o) Los gobiernos, en cooperación con otras partes interesadas, deben fomentar la sensibilización acerca de la importancia de establecer estándares compatibles internacionales para el comercio electrónico global.

p) Los gobiernos, en cooperación con otras partes interesadas, deben promover la elaboración y utilización de normas abiertas, compatibles, no discriminatorias e impulsadas por la demanda.

q) La UIT, en ejercicio de su capacidad para elaborar tratados, coordina y atribuye frecuencias con el objeto de facilitar un acceso ubicuo y asequible.

r) La UIT y otras organizaciones regionales deben adoptar medidas adicionales para asegurar la utilización racional, eficaz y económica del espectro de frecuencias radioeléctricas, así como el acceso equitativo, por parte de todos los países, sobre la base de los acuerdos internacionales correspondientes.

C7. Aplicaciones de las TIC: ventajas en todos los aspectos de la vida

14 Las aplicaciones TIC pueden apoyar el desarrollo sostenible en la administración pública, los negocios, la educación y capacitación, la salud, el empleo, el medio ambiente, la agricultura y la ciencia en el marco de ciberestrategias nacionales. Se han de tomar medidas en los siguientes ámbitos:

15 Gobierno electrónico

a) Aplicar estrategias de gobierno electrónico centradas en aplicaciones encaminadas a la innovación y a promover la transparencia en las administraciones públicas y los procesos democráticos, mejorando la eficiencia y fortaleciendo las relaciones con los ciudadanos.

b) Concebir a todos los niveles iniciativas y servicios nacionales de gobierno electrónico que se adapten a las necesidades de los ciudadanos y empresarios, con el fin de lograr una distribución más eficaz de los recursos y los bienes públicos.

c) Apoyar las iniciativas de cooperación internacional en la esfera del gobierno electrónico, con el fin de mejorar la transparencia, responsabilidad y eficacia en todos los niveles de gobierno.

16 Negocios electrónicos

a) Se alienta a los gobiernos, las organizaciones internacionales y el sector privado a que promuevan los beneficios del comercio internacional y el uso de los negocios electrónicos, y a fomentar el uso de modelos de negocios electrónicos en los países en desarrollo y en los países con economías en transición.

b) Mediante la adopción de un entorno propicio, y sobre la base de una amplia disponibilidad de acceso a Internet, los gobiernos deben tratar de estimular la inversión del sector privado, y propiciar nuevas aplicaciones, la elaboración de contenido y las asociaciones entre los sectores público y privado.

c) Las políticas gubernamentales deben favorecer la asistencia a las pequeñas, medianas y microempresas, y fomentar su crecimiento en la industria de las TIC, así como su adopción de los negocios electrónicos, para estimular el crecimiento económico y la creación de empleo, en el marco de una estrategia para reducir la pobreza mediante la creación de riqueza.

17 Aprendizaje electrónico (véase la sección C4)

18 Cibersalud

a) Promover la colaboración entre gobiernos, planificadores, profesionales de la salud y otras entidades, con la participación de organizaciones internacionales, para crear sistemas de información y de atención de salud fiables, oportunos, de gran calidad y asequibles, y para promover la capacitación, la enseñanza y la investigación continuas en medicina mediante la utilización de las TIC, respetando y protegiendo siempre el derecho de los ciudadanos a la privacidad.

b) Facilitar el acceso a los conocimientos médicos mundiales y al contenido de carácter local para fortalecer la investigación en materia de salud y programas de prevención públicos y para promover la salud de las mujeres y los hombres; tales contenidos pueden ser sobre la salud sexual y reproductiva, las infecciones de transmisión sexual y las enfermedades que suscitan una atención generalizada a nivel mundial, tales como el VIH/SIDA, el paludismo y la tuberculosis.

c) Alertar, vigilar y controlar la propagación de enfermedades contagiosas, mejorando los sistemas comunes de información.

d) Promover el desarrollo de normas internacionales para el intercambio de datos sobre salud, teniendo debidamente en cuenta las consideraciones de privacidad.

e) Alentar la adopción de las TIC para mejorar y extender los sistemas de atención sanitaria y de información sobre la salud a las zonas distantes y desatendidas, así como a las poblaciones vulnerables, teniendo en cuenta las funciones que desempeñan las mujeres como proveedoras de atención de salud en sus familias y comunidades.

f) Fortalecer y ampliar las iniciativas basadas en las TIC para proporcionar asistencia médica y humanitaria en situaciones de catástrofe y emergencias.

19 Ciberempleo

a) Alentar la definición de prácticas óptimas para los cibertrabajadores y los ciberempleadores basadas, a nivel nacional, en los principios de justicia e igualdad de género y en el respeto de todas las normas internacionales pertinentes.

b) Promover nuevas formas de organizar el trabajo y los negocios con miras a aumentar la productividad, el crecimiento y el bienestar mediante inversiones en TIC y en recursos humanos.

c) Promover el teletrabajo para permitir que los ciudadanos, especialmente los de los países en desarrollo, los PMA y las economías pequeñas, vivan en sus sociedades y trabajen en cualquier lugar, así como para aumentar las oportunidades de empleo de las mujeres y las personas discapacitadas. Al definir las políticas de teletrabajo, hay que prestar especial atención a las estrategias que promuevan la creación de empleos y el mantenimiento de la mano de obra calificada.

d) Promover programas de iniciación temprana de las niñas jóvenes en la esfera de la ciencia y la tecnología, para acrecentar el número de mujeres en carreras relacionadas con las TIC.

20 Ciberecología

a) Se alienta a los gobiernos a que, en colaboración con otras partes interesadas, utilicen y promuevan las TIC como instrumento para la protección ambiental y la utilización sostenible de los recursos naturales.

b) Se alienta a los gobiernos, la sociedad civil y el sector privado a emprender actividades y ejecutar proyectos y programas encaminados a la producción y el consumo sostenibles, y a la eliminación y reciclado de los equipos y piezas utilizados en las TIC al final de su vida útil, de manera inocua para el medio ambiente.

c) Establecer sistemas de vigilancia, utilizando las TIC, para prever y supervisar el efecto de catástrofes naturales y provocadas por el hombre, particularmente en los países en desarrollo, los PMA y las pequeñas economías.

21 Ciberagricultura

a) Garantizar la difusión sistemática de información, utilizando las TIC, en la agricultura, ganadería, piscicultura, silvicultura y alimentación, con el fin de proporcionar rápido acceso a conocimientos e información completos, actualizados y detallados, especialmente en las zonas rurales.

b) Las asociaciones de los sectores público y privado deben tratar de aprovechar al máximo las TIC como instrumento para mejorar la producción (cantidad y calidad).

22 Ciberciencia

a) Promover una conexión a Internet asequible, fiable y de alta velocidad en todas las universidades e instituciones de investigación para apoyar su función crucial de producción de información y de conocimientos, educación y capacitación, y apoyar la creación de asociaciones, la cooperación y el intercambio entre estas instituciones.

b) Promover iniciativas de publicación electrónica, precios adaptados al mercado local y acceso abierto, a fin que la información científica sea asequible y accesible en todos los países, en condiciones equitativas.

c) Promover el uso de tecnología entre pares para compartir el conocimiento científico, los manuscritos y reediciones de documentos de autores científicos que han renunciado a la debida remuneración.

d) Propiciar la recopilación, difusión y preservación sistemáticas y eficientes a largo plazo de datos digitales científicos esenciales, tales como los datos demográficos y meteorológicos de todos los países.

e) Fomentar la adopción de principios y normas en materia de metadatos, que faciliten la cooperación y la utilización eficaz de la información y los datos científicos compilados, en su caso, para realizar investigaciones científicas.

C8. Diversidad e identidad culturales, diversidad lingüística y contenido local

23 La diversidad cultural y lingüística, al mismo tiempo que promueve el respeto de la identidad cultural, las tradiciones y las religiones, es fundamental para el desarrollo de una Sociedad de la Información basada en el diálogo entre culturas y en la cooperación regional e internacional. Es un factor importante del desarrollo sostenible.

a) Crear políticas que apoyen el respeto, la conservación, la promoción y el realce de la diversidad cultural y lingüística y del patrimonio cultural en la Sociedad de la Información, como se recoge en los documentos pertinentes acordados por las Naciones Unidas, incluida la Declaración Universal de la UNESCO sobre la Diversidad Cultural. Esto incluye alentar a los gobiernos a que conciban políticas culturales que promuevan la producción de contenido cultural, educativo y científico y el desarrollo de industrias culturales locales adaptadas al contexto lingüístico y cultural de los usuarios.

b) Formular políticas y legislaciones nacionales para garantizar que las bibliotecas, los archivos, los museos y otras instituciones culturales puedan desempeñar plenamente su función de proveedores de contenido (lo que incluye los conocimientos tradicionales) en la Sociedad de la Información, especialmente, ofreciendo un acceso permanente a la información registrada.

c) Apoyar las actividades encaminadas a desarrollar y utilizar las TIC para la conservación del patrimonio natural y cultural, a fin de mantenerlo accesible como una parte viva de la cultura actual. Esto incluye el desarrollo de sistemas que garanticen el acceso continuo a la información digital y el contenido en soportes multimedios archivados en registros digitales, y apoyar los archivos, las colecciones culturales y las bibliotecas como memoria de la humanidad.

d) Formular y aplicar políticas que preserven, afirmen, respeten y promuevan la diversidad de la expresión cultural, y los conocimientos y tradiciones autóctonos mediante la creación de contenido de información variado, y la utilización de diferentes métodos, entre otros, la digitalización del patrimonio educativo, científico y cultural.

e) Apoyar las actividades de las autoridades locales en la creación, traducción y adaptación de contenido local, el establecimiento de archivos digitales, y los diversos medios digitales y tradicionales. Estas actividades pueden fortalecer a las comunidades locales e indígenas.

f) Proporcionar contenido pertinente a las culturas y los idiomas de los integrantes de la Sociedad de la Información, mediante el acceso a servicios de comunicación tradicionales y digitales.

g) Fomentar, mediante asociaciones de los sectores público y privado, la creación de contenido local y nacional variado, incluido el que esté disponible en el idioma de los usuarios, y reconocer y apoyar el trabajo basado en las TIC en todos los campos artísticos.

h) Reforzar los programas centrados en planes de estudios con un componente de género importante, en la educación escolar y extraescolar para todos, y mejorar la comunicación y formación de las mujeres en los medios de comunicación, con el fin de que las mujeres y niñas sean capaces de comprender y elaborar contenido en las TIC.

i) Favorecer la capacidad local de creación y distribución de software en idiomas locales, así como contenido que sea pertinente a diferentes segmentos de la población, incluidos los analfabetos, las personas con discapacidades y los grupos desfavorecidos o vulnerables, especialmente en los países en desarrollo y en los países con economías en transición.

j) Apoyar los medios de comunicación basados en las comunidades locales y respaldar los proyectos que combinen el uso de medios de comunicación tradicionales y de nuevas tecnologías para facilitar el uso de idiomas locales, para documentar y preservar el patrimonio local, lo que incluye el paisaje y la diversidad biológica, y como medio de llegar a las comunidades rurales, aisladas y nómadas.

k) Desarrollar la capacidad de las poblaciones indígenas para elaborar contenidos en sus propios idiomas.

l) Colaborar con las poblaciones indígenas y las comunidades tradicionales para ayudarlas a utilizar más eficazmente y sacar provecho del uso de sus conocimientos tradicionales en la Sociedad de la Información.

m) Intercambiar conocimientos, experiencias y prácticas óptimas sobre políticas e instrumentos concebidos para promover la diversidad lingüística y cultural en el ámbito regional y subregional. Esto puede lograrse estableciendo grupos de trabajo regionales y subregionales sobre aspectos específicos del presente Plan de Acción, para fomentar los esfuerzos de integración.

n) Evaluar en el plano regional la contribución de las TIC al intercambio y la interacción culturales y, basándose en los resultados de esta evaluación, diseñar programas pertinentes.

o) Los gobiernos, mediante asociaciones entre los sectores público y privado, deben promover tecnologías y programas de investigación y desarrollo en esferas como la traducción, la iconografía, los servicios asistidos por la voz, así como el desarrollo de los equipos necesarios y diversos tipos de modelos de software , entre otros, software protegido, de fuente abierta o software libre , tales como juegos de caracteres normalizados, códigos lingüísticos, diccionarios electrónicos, terminología y diccionarios ideológicos, motores de búsqueda plurilingües, herramientas de traducción automática, nombres de dominio internacionalizados, referencias de contenidos y programas informáticos generales y de aplicaciones.

C9. Medios de comunicación

24 Los medios de comunicación, en sus diversas formas, y con sus diversos regímenes de propiedad, tienen también un cometido indispensable como actores en el desarrollo de la Sociedad de la Información, y se reconoce su importante contribución a la libertad de expresión y la pluralidad de la información.

a) Alentar a los medios de comunicación –prensa y radiodifusión, así como los nuevos medios de difusión- a que sigan desempeñando un papel importante en la Sociedad de la Información.

b) Fomentar la formulación de legislaciones nacionales que garanticen la independencia y pluralidad de los medios de comunicación.

c) Tomar medidas apropiadas, compatibles con la libertad de expresión, para combatir los contenidos ilícitos y perjudiciales en los medios de comunicación.

d) Alentar a los profesionales de los medios de comunicación de los países desarrollados a crear asociaciones y redes con los medios de comunicación de los países en desarrollo, especialmente en el campo de la capacitación.

e) Promover una imagen equilibrada y variada de la mujer y el hombre en los medios de comunicación.

f) Reducir los desequilibrios internacionales que afectan a los medios de comunicación, en particular en lo que respecta a la infraestructura, los recursos técnicos y el desarrollo de las capacidades humanas, aprovechando todas las ventajas que ofrecen las TIC al respecto.

g) Alentar a los medios de comunicación tradicionales a reducir la brecha del conocimiento y facilitar el flujo de contenido cultural, en particular en las zonas rurales.

C10. Dimensiones éticas de la Sociedad de la Información

25 La Sociedad de la Información debe basarse en valores aceptados universalmente, promover el bien común e impedir la utilización abusiva de las TIC.

a) Tomar medidas encaminadas a promover el respeto de la paz y el mantenimiento de los valores fundamentales de libertad, igualdad, solidaridad, tolerancia, responsabilidad compartida y respeto a la naturaleza.

b) Todas las partes interesadas deben incrementar su conciencia de la dimensión ética de su utilización de las TIC.

c) Todos los actores de la Sociedad de la Información deben promover el bien común, proteger la privacidad y los datos personales así como adoptar las medidas preventivas y acciones adecuadas (según lo establecido en la ley), contra la utilización abusiva de las TIC, tales como, las conductas ilegales y otros actos motivados por el racismo, la discriminación racial, la xenofobia y las formas conexas de intolerancia, el odio, la violencia, y todas las formas de maltrato infantil, incluidas la pedofilia y la pornografía infantil, así como la trata y la explotación de seres humanos.

d) Invitar a las partes interesadas correspondientes, especialmente al sector académico, a seguir investigando sobre las dimensiones éticas de las TIC.

C11. Cooperación internacional y regional

26 La cooperación internacional entre todas las partes interesadas es fundamental para aplicar el presente Plan de Acción y ha de reforzarse con miras a promover el acceso universal y colmar la brecha digital, entre otras cosas, definiendo modalidades de aplicación.

a) Los gobiernos de los países en desarrollo deben elevar la prioridad relativa que se asigna a los proyectos de TIC en las solicitudes de cooperación y asistencia internacionales para proyectos de desarrollo de infraestructura que formulen a los países desarrollados y a las organizaciones financieras internacionales.

b) En el contexto del llamado "Pacto Mundial" de las Naciones Unidas y sobre la base de la Declaración del Milenio de las Naciones Unidas, acelerar el establecimiento de asociaciones entre entidades públicas y privadas y basarse en ellas, enfatizando a la utilización de las TIC para el desarrollo.

c) Invitar a las organizaciones internacionales y regionales a que utilicen las TIC en sus programas de trabajo y a que ayuden en todos los niveles a los países en desarrollo a participar en la preparación y aplicación de planes de acción nacionales destinados a apoyar la consecución de las metas indicadas en la Declaración de Principios y en el presente Plan de Acción, teniendo en cuenta la importancia de las iniciativas regionales.

D. Agenda de Solidaridad Digital

27 La Agenda de Solidaridad Digital tiene por objeto fijar las condiciones necesarias para movilizar los recursos humanos, financieros y tecnológicos que permitan incluir a todos los hombres y mujeres en la Sociedad de la Información emergente. En la aplicación de esta agenda es vital una estrecha cooperación nacional, regional e internacional entre todas las partes interesadas. Para superar la brecha digital, necesitamos utilizar más eficientemente los enfoques y mecanismos existentes y analizar a fondo otros nuevos, con el fin de proporcionar fondos para financiar el desarrollo de infraestructuras y equipos, así como la creación de capacidad y contenidos, factores que son esenciales para la participación en la Sociedad de la Información.

D1. Prioridades y estrategias

a) Las ciberestrategias nacionales deben constituir parte integrante de los planes de desarrollo nacionales, incluyendo las estrategias de reducción de la pobreza.

b) Las TIC deben incorporarse plenamente en las estrategias de asistencia oficial para el desarrollo (AOD) a través de un intercambio de información y una coordinación más eficaces entre los donantes, y mediante el análisis y el intercambio de prácticas óptimas y enseñanzas extraídas de la experiencia adquirida con los programas de TIC para el desarrollo.

D2. Movilización de recursos

a) Todos los países y las organizaciones internacionales deben buscar crear condiciones conducentes a acrecentar la disponibilidad y la movilización efectiva de recursos para financiar el desarrollo, según se establece en el Consenso de Monterrey.

b) Los países desarrollados deben llevar a cabo esfuerzos concretos para cumplir sus compromisos internacionales de financiamiento del desarrollo, incluido el Consenso de Monterrey, en el cual se insta a los países desarrollados que aún no lo han hecho, a iniciar actividades concretas para destinar el 0,7 por ciento de su Producto Nacional Bruto (PNB) a la AOD para los países en desarrollo y el 0,15-0,20 por ciento de su PNB a los países menos adelantados.

c) En el caso de los países en desarrollo cuya carga de la deuda es insostenible, acogemos con agrado las iniciativas emprendidas para reducir la deuda pendiente, e invitamos a que se adopten más medidas nacionales e internacionales a este respecto, incluidas, cuando proceda, la cancelación de las deudas y otras medidas. Se debe conceder particular atención a ampliar la Iniciativa en favor de los Países Pobres muy Endeudados. Iniciativas de este tipo liberarían más recursos para financiar los proyectos de TIC para el desarrollo.

d) Habida cuenta del potencial de las TIC para el desarrollo, abogamos además por que:

i) los países en desarrollo redoblen sus esfuerzos para atraer un gran volumen de inversión privada nacional y extranjera en las TIC, mediante la creación de un entorno transparente, estable y predecible propicio para la inversión;

ii) los países desarrollados y las organizaciones financieras internacionales respondan a las estrategias y prioridades de las TIC en favor del desarrollo, introduzcan las TIC en sus programas de trabajo y ayuden a los países en desarrollo y a los países con economías en transición a preparar y aplicar sus ciberestrategias nacionales. Basándose en las prioridades de los planes de desarrollo nacionales y la aplicación de los citados compromisos, los países desarrollados deben redoblar sus esfuerzos para proporcionar más recursos financieros a los países en desarrollo, con el fin de que éstos puedan utilizar las TIC para su desarrollo.

iii) el sector privado contribuya a la aplicación de la Agenda de Solidaridad Digital.

e) En nuestras actividades encaminadas a colmar la brecha digital, debemos promover, en el marco de nuestra cooperación para el desarrollo, la asistencia técnica y financiera destinada a la creación de capacidad a escala nacional y regional, la transferencia de tecnología conforme a acuerdos mutuos, la cooperación en programas de investigación y desarrollo, y el intercambio de conocimientos y experiencia.

f) Si bien deben aprovecharse plenamente los mecanismos de financiación existentes, debe finalizarse antes de diciembre de 2004 un examen pormenorizado a fin de determinar si son suficientes para hacer frente a las dificultades de las TIC para el desarrollo. Este examen estará a cargo de un grupo especial, bajo los auspicios del Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, y se someterá a la consideración de esta Cumbre, en su segunda fase. Sobre la base de las conclusiones del examen, se considerarán mejoras e innovaciones a los mecanismos de financiación, incluyendo la eficacia, la viabilidad y la creación de un Fondo de Solidaridad Digital, alimentado con contribuciones voluntarias, como se menciona en la Declaración de Principios.

g) Los países deben contemplar la posibilidad de establecer mecanismos nacionales para lograr el acceso universal en las zonas rurales y urbanas desatendidas, con el fin de colmar la brecha digital.

E. Seguimiento y evaluación

28 Se debe elaborar un plan realista de evaluación de resultados y establecimiento de referencias (tanto cualitativas como cuantitativas) en el plano internacional, a través de indicadores estadísticos comparables y resultados de investigación, para dar seguimiento a la aplicación de los objetivos y metas del presente Plan de Acción, teniendo en cuenta las circunstancias de cada país.

a) En cooperación con cada país interesado, definir y lanzar un índice compuesto sobre el desarrollo de las TIC (índice de oportunidad digital). Este índice se podría publicar anual o bienalmente en un Informe sobre el desarrollo de las TIC. En dicho índice se podrían incluir las estadísticas, mientras que en el Informe se presentaría el trabajo analítico sobre las políticas y su aplicación, dependiendo de las circunstancias de cada país, con inclusión de un análisis por género.

b) Los indicadores y puntos de referencia apropiados, incluidos los indicadores de conectividad comunitaria, deberían mostrar claramente la magnitud de la brecha digital, en su dimensión tanto nacional como internacional, y mantenerla en evaluación periódica, con miras a medir los progresos logrados en la utilización de las TIC para alcanzar los objetivos de desarrollo internacionalmente acordados, incluidos los consignados en la Declaración del Milenio.

c) Las organizaciones internacionales y regionales deben evaluar e informar periódicamente sobre el acceso universal de los países a las TIC, con objeto de crear oportunidades equitativas en favor del crecimiento de los sectores de las TIC de los países en desarrollo.

d) Se deben elaborar indicadores específicos por género sobre el uso y las necesidades de las TIC, e identificar indicadores cuantificables de resultados, para evaluar el efecto de los proyectos de TIC financiados en la vida de mujeres y niñas.

e) Crear y poner en funcionamiento un sitio web sobre prácticas óptimas y proyectos con resultados satisfactorios, basado en una recopilación de las contribuciones de todas las partes interesadas, con un formato conciso, accesible y atrayente, acorde con las normas internacionalmente aceptadas de accesibilidad a la web. Ese sitio web podría actualizarse periódicamente y convertirse en un mecanismo permanente de intercambio de experiencias.

f) Todos los países y regiones deben concebir instrumentos destinados a proporcionar estadísticas sobre la Sociedad de la Información, con indicadores básicos y análisis de sus dimensiones clave. Se debe dar prioridad al establecimiento de sistemas de indicadores coherentes y comparables a escala internacional, teniendo en cuenta los distintos niveles de desarrollo.

F. Hacia la segunda fase de la CMSI (Túnez)

29 Recordando la Resolución 56/183 de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas, y habida cuenta de los resultados de la CMSI en su fase de Ginebra, durante el primer semestre de 2004 se celebrará una reunión preparatoria, a fin de examinar las cuestiones relacionadas con la Sociedad de la Información de las que se ocupará principalmente la CMSI en su fase de Túnez, y acordar la estructura del proceso preparatorio de la segunda fase. De conformidad con la decisión que se adopte en esta Cumbre en relación con la fase de Túnez, la CMSI debería examinar, en su segunda fase, los siguientes asuntos, entre otros.

a) Elaboración de documentos finales adecuados que se basen en los resultados de la CMSI en su fase de Ginebra, con miras a consolidar el proceso de construcción de una Sociedad de la Información global y colmar la brecha digital, transformándola en oportunidades digitales.

b) Seguimiento y aplicación del Plan de Acción de Ginebra a escala nacional, regional e internacional y, en particular, a través del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, en el marco de un enfoque integrado y coordinado, que invite a la participación de todas las partes interesadas, lo que podría llevarse a cabo, por ejemplo, mediante la creación de asociaciones entre las partes interesadas.

voltar

 

 


OECD Declaration on Access to Research Data From Public Funding
January 30, 2004

DECLARATION ON ACCESS TO RESEARCH DATA FROM PUBLIC FUNDING

adopted on 30 January 2004 in Paris

The governments (1) of Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Russian Federation, the Slovak Republic, the Republic of South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States

Recognising that an optimum international exchange of data, information and knowledge contributes decisively to the advancement of scientific research and innovation;

Recognising that open access to, and unrestricted use of, data promotes scientific progress and facilitates the training of researchers;

Recognising that open access will maximise the value derived from public investments in data collection efforts;

Recognising that the substantial increase in computing capacity enables vast quantities of digital research data from public funding to be put to use for multiple research purposes by many research institutes of the global science system, thereby substantially increasing the scope and scale of research;

Recognising the substantial benefits that science, the economy and society at large could gain from the opportunities that expanded use of digital data resources have to offer, and recognising the risk that undue restrictions on access to and use of research data from public funding could diminish the quality and efficiency of scientific research and innovation;

Recognising that optimum availability of research data from public funding for developing countries will enhance their participation in the global science system, thereby contributing to their social and economic development;

Recognising that the disclosure of research data from public funding may be constrained by domestic law on national security, the protection of privacy of citizens and the protection of intellectual property rights and trade secrets that may require additional safeguards;

Recognising that on some of the aspects of the accessibility of research data from public funding, additional measures have been taken or will be introduced in OECD countries and that disparities in national regulations could hamper the optimum use of publicly funded data on the national and international scales;

Considering the beneficial impact of the establishment of OECD Guidelines on the Protection of Privacy and Transborder Flows of Personal Data (1980, 1985 and 1998) and the OECD Guidelines for the Security of Information Systems and Networks (1992, 1997 and 2002) on international policies for access to digital data;

DECLARE THEIR COMMITMENT TO:

Work towards the establishment of access regimes for digital research data from public funding in accordance with the following objectives and principles:

Openness: balancing the interests of open access to data to increase the quality and efficiency of research and innovation with the need for restriction of access in some instances to protect social, scientific and economic interests.

Transparency: making information on data-producing organisations, documentation on the data they produce and specifications of conditions attached to the use of these data, available and accessible internationally.

Legal conformity: paying due attention, in the design of access regimes for digital research data, to national legal requirements concerning national security, privacy and trade secrets.

Formal responsibility: promoting explicit, formal institutional rules on the responsibilities of the various parties involved in data-related activities pertaining to authorship, producer credits, ownership, usage restrictions, financial arrangements, ethical rules, licensing terms, and liability.

Professionalism: building institutional rules for the management of digital research data based on the relevant professional standards and values embodied in the codes of conduct of the scientific communities involved.

Protection of intellectual property: describing ways to obtain open access under the different legal regimes of copyright or other intellectual property law applicable to databases as well as trade secrets.

Interoperability: paying due attention to the relevant international standard requirements for use in multiple ways, in co-operation with other international organisations.

Quality and security: describing good practices for methods, techniques and instruments employed in the collection, dissemination and accessible archiving of data to enable quality control by peer review and other means of safeguarding authenticity, originality, integrity, security and establishing liability.

Efficiency: promoting further cost effectiveness within the global science system by describing good practices in data management and specialised support services.

Accountability: evaluating the performance of data access regimes to maximise the support for open access among the scientific community and society at large.

Seek transparency in regulations and policies related to information, computer and communications services affecting international flows of data for research, and reducing unnecessary barriers to the international exchange of these data;

Take the necessary steps to strengthen existing instruments and - where appropriate - create within the framework of international and national law, new mechanisms and practices supporting international collaboration in access to digital research data;

Support OECD initiatives to promote the development and harmonisation of approaches by governments adhering to this Declaration aimed at maximising the accessibility of digital research data;

Consider the possible implications for other countries, including developing countries and economies in transition, when dealing with issues of access to digital research data.

INVITE THE OECD:

To develop a set of OECD guidelines based on commonly agreed principles to facilitate optimal cost-effective access to digital research data from public funding, to be endorsed by the OECD Council at a later stage.

___________
(1) Including the European Community

Source: http://www.oecd.org/document/0,2340,en_2649_34487_25998799_1_1_1_1,00.html

voltar

 

 


IFLA Statement on Open Access to Scholarly Literature and Research Documentation
February 24, 2004

IFLA Statement on
Open Access to Scholarly Literature and Research Documentation

IFLA (the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) is committed to ensuring the widest possible access to information for all peoples in accordance with the principles expressed in the Glasgow Declaration on Libraries, Information Services and Intellectual Freedom.

IFLA acknowledges that the discovery, contention, elaboration and application of research in all fields will enhance progress, sustainability and human well being. Peer reviewed scholarly literature is a vital element in the processes of research and scholarship. It is supported by a range of research documentation, which includes pre-prints, technical reports and records of research data.

IFLA declares that the world-wide network of library and information services provides access to past, present and future scholarly literature and research documentation; ensures its preservation; assists users in discovery and use; and offers educational programs to enable users to develop lifelong literacies.

IFLA affirms that comprehensive open access to scholarly literature and research documentation is vital to the understanding of our world and to the identification of solutions to global challenges and particularly the reduction of information inequality.

Open access guarantees the integrity of the system of scholarly communication by ensuring that all research and scholarship will be available in perpetuity for unrestricted examination and, where relevant, elaboration or refutation.
IFLA recognises the important roles played by all involved in the recording and dissemination of research, including authors, editors, publishers, libraries and institutions, and advocates the adoption of the following open access principles in order to ensure the widest possible availability of scholarly literature and research documentation:

1. Acknowledgement and defence of the moral rights of authors, especially the rights of attribution and integrity.
2. Adoption of effective peer review processes to assure the quality of scholarly literature irrespective of mode of publication.
3. Resolute opposition to governmental, commercial or institutional censorship of the publications deriving from research and scholarship.
4. Succession to the public domain of all scholarly literature and research documentation at the expiration of the limited period of copyright protection provided by law, which period should be limited to a reasonable time, and the exercise of fair use provisions, unhindered by technological or other constraints, to ensure ready access by researchers and the general public during the period of protection.
5. Implementation of measures to overcome information inequality by enabling both publication of quality assured scholarly literature and research documentation by researchers and scholars who may be disadvantaged, and also ensuring effective and affordable access for the peoples of developing nations and all who experience disadvantage including the disabled.
6. Support for collaborative initiatives to develop sustainable open access* publishing models and facilities including encouragement, such as the removal of contractual obstacles, for authors to make scholarly literature and research documentation available without charge.
7. Implementation of legal, contractual and technical mechanisms to ensure the preservation and perpetual availability, usability and authenticity of all scholarly literature and research documentation.

This statement was adopted by the Governing Board of IFLA at its meeting in The Hague on 5th December 2003.

Definition of open access publication:
An open access publication is one that meets the following two conditions:

1. The author(s) and copyright holder(s) grant(s) to all users a free, irrevocable, world-wide, perpetual (for the lifetime of the applicable copyright) right of access to, and a licence to copy, use, distribute, perform and display the work publicly and to make and distribute derivative works in any digital medium for any reasonable purpose, subject to proper attribution of authorship, as well as the right to make small numbers of printed copies for their personal use.
2. A complete version of the work and all supplemental materials, including a copy of the permission as stated above, in a suitable standard electronic format is deposited immediately upon initial publication in at least one online repository that is supported by an academic institution, scholarly society, government agency, or other well-established organisation that seeks to enable open access, unrestricted distribution, interoperability, and long-term archiving.

An open access publication is a property of individual works, not necessarily of journals or of publishers.

Community standards, rather than copyright law, will continue to provide the mechanism for enforcement of proper attribution and responsible use of the published work, as they do now.

This definition of open access publication has been taken from A Position statement by the Wellcome Trust in support of open access publishing and was based on the definition arrived at by delegates who attended a meeting on open access publishing convened by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in July 2003.

Source: http://www.ifla.org/V/cdoc/open-access04.html

voltar

 


Australian Group of Eight Statement on open access to scholarly information
May 25, 2004

Statement on open access to scholarly information

The Group of Eight vice-chancellors, representing Australia's pre-eminent research universities, record their commitment to open access initiatives
that will enhance global access to scholarly information for the public good.

The vice-chancellors note that:

* information, if it is to achieve maximum benefit for society, must be readily available to a global audience

* the rapid development of digital communication technologies provides expanded opportunities for the widespread dissemination of scholarly information

* new business models are required to ensure that scholarly publishing is cost effective

* any development in digital publishing must incorporate the current framework of scholarly publishing standards relating to the quality of inquiry and reporting

* digital publishing initiatives must appropriately recognise and protect the intellectual property of the authors and require accepted standards of attribution

* the Group of Eight universities are providing leadership in the development of digital publishing initiatives in Australia.

The vice-chancellors support:

* ongoing development of open access initiatives in Group of Eight universities

* digital publishing practices that underpin the timely, cost-effective dissemination of the highest quality scholarly information with a commitment to good practice

* further examination of criteria for promotion in new publishing models.

Professor Ian W. Chubb AO
Chair, The Group of Eight
Vice-Chancellor
The Australian National University

Professor James McWha
Vice-Chancellor
The University of Adelaide

Professor Kwong Lee Dow AM
Vice-Chancellor
The University of Melbourne

Professor Richard Larkins AO
Vice-Chancellor
Monash University

Professor Mark Wainwright
Vice-Chancellor
The University of New South Wales

Professor John A. Hay AC
Vice-Chancellor
The University of Queensland

Professor Gavin Brown
Vice-Chancellor
The University of Sydney

Professor Alan Robson AM
Vice-Chancellor
The University of Western Australia

April 2004

 

voltar

 

 

 


Declaration from Buenos Aires, Argentina
I. Forum
Social de Información, Documentación y Bibliotecas
August 28, 2004

DECLARACIÓN DE BUENOS AIRES
Sobre información, documentación y bibliotecas

Las y los asistentes al 1er Foro Social de Información, Documentación y Bibliotecas: programas de acción alternativa desde Latinoamérica para la sociedad del conocimiento, celebrado en la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires del 26 al 28 de agosto de 2004, convocado por el Grupo de Estudios Sociales en Bibliotecología y Documentación (Argentina) y el Círculo de Estudios sobre Bibliotecología Política y Social (México),

Reconocemos que:

La información, el conocimiento, la documentación, los archivos y las bibliotecas son bienes y recursos culturales procomunales para fundamentar y promover los valores de la democracia, tales como: la libertad, la igualdad y la justicia social, así como la tolerancia, el respeto, la equidad, la solidaridad, la dignidad de los individuos, las comunidades y la sociedad.

Todo recinto de información documental contribuye a impulsar la práctica democrática en las esferas social y política. Conscientes de esta dimensión, la fundación y organización de estos bienes y recursos deben construirse bajo el principio del acceso al conocimiento y la información de forma libre, abierta, igualitaria y gratuita para tod@s.

Asimismo, se presentan como elementos sociales y políticos que las y los bibliotecarios, documentalistas y archivistas deben aprovechar para contribuir a la formación de identidades culturales y ciudadanas sustentadas en valores cívicos y responsabilidades sociales.

Consideramos que:

Las y los bibliotecarios, documentalistas y archivistas deben participar en los procesos sociales y políticos que se relacionan con su quehacer cultural, ámbito laboral y ejercicio profesional.

Estos trabajadores de la cultura son facilitadores del cambio social, formadores de opinión, promotores de la democratización de la información y el conocimiento, gestores educativos y actores comprometidos con los procesos sociales y políticos, por lo tanto, el trabajo que desempeñan es de fundamental relevancia para la sociedad y el Estado, por lo que debe otorgárseles pleno reconocimiento social, así como un salario digno y justo regulado por la legislación de cada país.

La cooperación y solidaridad profesionales así como la integración en redes, son mecanismos valiosos para fomentar el intercambio de experiencias exitosas y potenciar el alcance de los objetivos y retos en nuestro quehacer cotidiano.

Las bibliotecas, los archivos y centros de documentación deben ser espacios para contribuir al desarrollo de los derechos humanos y coadyuvar con la preservación de la memoria y recuperación de las tradiciones orales y escritas para asegurar la autodeterminación y soberanía de los pueblos.

Los servicios bibliotecarios y de información, vinculados al libre desarrollo de colecciones, deben planificarse, construirse y ofrecerse mediante la colaboración conjunta entre las personas, comunidades y organizaciones -principalmente las menos favorecidas social y políticamente- con las y los bibliotecarios, documentalistas y archivistas.

Tanto la teoría como la práctica de la bibliotecología, la documentación y la archivonomía están determinadas por las necesidades que se generan en la estructura social; por ende, la creación y el ejercicio de estas disciplinas y profesiones deben cumplir la misión de fomentar la opinión pública, el juicio crítico, la libre toma de decisiones y contribuir activamente en el combate contra el analfabetismo en todas sus variantes entre la comunidad de sus usuarios con el fin de mejorar la vida y el entorno colectivo o personal de los mismos.

Las y los bibliotecarios, documentalistas y archivistas deben construir espacios de intercambio público de información al interior de sus comunidades, para incentivar la discusión sobre temas políticos, sociales, ideológicos y culturales inherentes a los problemas de la sociedad y el gobierno, estimando el ejercicio neutral o no neutral de su pensamiento individual, acción laboral y participación ciudadana.

La información, el conocimiento, la documentación y las bibliotecas son un bien común público que no deben estar regidos ni determinados por las dinámicas de los mercados, sino instrumentados por las políticas públicas de desarrollo, bienestar y defensa de la riqueza cultural de la sociedad, en aras de garantizar el dominio público, la diversidad, la pluralidad y la identidad de todos los sectores de la población.

La construcción de discursos, desde la realidad de América Latina y el Caribe, implica el uso de las lenguas nacionales como un medio de comunicación, reconocimiento y posicionamiento en el ámbito profesional mundial. Asimismo, conscientes que las lenguas indígenas son una realidad social y política en varias naciones latinoamericanas y del Caribe, es necesario reconocerlas como generadoras de discursos, orales y escritos, para la información, la documentación, las bibliotecas y los archivos, a grado tal que se contribuya a evitar la extinción de esas lenguas.

La paz es garante y condición necesaria para la preservación y el crecimiento de los repositorios de información y conocimiento. Acorde con esta idea, condenamos firmemente las guerras y toda forma de violencia que devaste la especie humana y sus culturas documentales. La promoción permanente de la paz y los procesos que conducen a ella son y deben ser un compromiso social de los bibliotecarios, documentalistas y archivistas en sus espacios de trabajo y en las esferas culturales, sociales y políticas que les atañen en su condición de ciudadanos.

Es necesario eliminar toda forma de discriminación: por sexo, edad, raza, etnia, ideología, condición económica, clase social, discapacidades, migración, orientación sexual, religión, lengua o cualquier otra en los sistemas de información, documentales y bibliotecarios para ofrecer servicios a los grupos minoritarios y socialmente vulnerables.

El grave deterioro ecológico de nuestro planeta afecta la vida en general y, en consecuencia, el bienestar y la calidad de vida de la especie humana. De tal manera, comprendemos que es fundamental que los profesionales de las bibliotecas y de la información vinculen los problemas del medio ambiente con la importancia que tiene el desarrollo, la organización, la circulación y la difusión de información de corte ambiental.

Declaramos como esencial el cumplimiento de los derechos que apelan a las libertades de acceso a la información, así como la justa distribución de los bienes y recursos documentales públicos.

Invitamos a tod@s a la suma de esfuerzos y voluntades para la consecución de los enunciados y propósitos de esta Declaración.

Desde América Latina y el Caribe para la sociedad del conocimiento.

Buenos Aires, 28 de agosto de 2004

Fuente: http://www.cebi.org.mx/declaracionbs.html
http://www.inforosocial.org/

voltar

 

 


Carta aberta de 25 ganhadores do Prêmio Nobel ao Congresso Americano
- em apoio ao acesso aberto a pesquisa financiada com fundos públicos

August 26, 2004

Dear Members of Congress:

As scientists and Nobel laureates, we are writing today to express our strong support for the House Appropriations Committee's recent direction to NIH to develop an open, taxpayer access policy requiring that a complete electronic text of any manuscript reporting work supported by NIH grants or contracts be supplied to the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central. We believe the time is now for all Members of Congress to support this enlightened policy.

Science is the measure of the human race's progress. As scientists and taxpayers too, we therefore object to barriers that hinder, delay or block the spread of scientific knowledge supported by federal tax dollars including our own works.

Thanks to the Internet, today the American people have access to several billion pages of information, frequently about disease and medical conditions. However, the published results of NIH-supported medical research for which they already have paid are all too often inaccessible to taxpayers.

When a woman goes online to find what treatment options are available to battle breast cancer, the cutting-edge, peer-reviewed research remains behind a high-fee barrier. Families looking to read clinical trial updates for a loved one with Huntington's disease search in vain because they do not have a journal subscription. Libraries, physicians, health care workers, students, researchers and thousands of academic institutions and companies are hindered by the costs and delays in making research widely accessible.

There's no question, open access truly expands shared knowledge across scientific fields -- it is the best path for accelerating multi-disciplinary breakthroughs in research.

Journal subscriptions can be prohibitively expensive. In the single field of biology, journals average around $1,400 and the price is almost double that in chemistry. These already-high prices are rising fast, far in excess of inflation and the growth of library budgets. An individual who cannot obtain access to a journal in a library may buy copies of solo articles they need, but that can cost them $30 or more for each article.

The National Institutes of Health has the means today to promote open access to taxpayer-funded research through the National Library of Medicine. If the proposal put forth in the House of Representatives is adopted, NIH grantees may be expected to provide to the Library an electronic copy of the final version of all manuscripts accepted for publication, after peer review, in legitimate medical and scientific journals. At the time of publication, NIH would make these reports freely available to all through their digital library archive, PubMed Central (PMC).

There is widespread acknowledgement that the current model for scientific publishing is failing us. An increase in the volume of research output, rising prices and static library budgets mean that libraries are struggling to purchase subscriptions to all the scientific journals needed.

Open access, however, will not mean the end of medical and scientific journals at all. They will continue to exercise peer-review over submitted papers as the basis for deciding which papers to accept for publication, just as they do now.

In addition, since open access will apply only to NIH-funded research; journals will still contain significant numbers of articles not covered by this requirement and other articles and commentary invaluable to the science community. Journals will continue to be the hallmark of achievement in scientific research, and we will depend on them.

The trend towards open access is gaining momentum. Japan, France and the United Kingdom are beginning to establish their own digital repositories for sharing content with NIH's PubMed Central. Free access to taxpayer funded research globally may soon be within grasp, and make possible the freer flow of medical knowledge that strengthens our capacity to find cures and to improve lives.

As the undersigned Nobel Laureates, we are committed to open access. We ask Congress and NIH to ensure that all taxpayers get their money's worth. Our investment in scientific research is not well served by a process that limits taxpayer access instead of expanding it. We specifically ask you to support the House Appropriations Committee language as well as NIH leadership in adopting this long overdue reform.

Signed by Twenty Five Nobel Laureates

Name, Category of Nobel Prize Awarded, Year

Peter Agre, Chemistry, 2003
Sidney Altman, Chemistry, 1989
Paul Berg, Chemistry, 1980
Michael Bishop, Physiology or Medicine, 1989
Baruch Blumberg, Physiology or Medicine, 1976
Gunter Blobel, Physiology or Medicine, 1999
Paul Boyer, Chemistry, 1997
Sydney Brenner, Physiology or Medicine, 2002
Johann Deisenhofer, Chemistry, 1988
Edmond Fischer, Physiology or Medicine, 1992
Paul Greengard, Physiology or Medicine, 2000
Leland Hartwell, Physiology or Medicine, 2001
Robert Horvitz, Physiology or Medicine, 2002
Eric Kandel, Physiology or Medicine, 2000
Arthur Kornberg, Physiology or Medicine, 1959
Roderick MacKinnon, Chemistry, 2003
Kary Mullis, Chemistry, 1993
Ferid Murad, Physiology or Medicine, 1998
Joseph Murray, Physiology or Medicine, 1990
Marshall Nirenberg, Physiology or Medicine, 1968
Stanley Prusiner, Physiology or Medicine, 1997
Richard Roberts, Physiology or Medicine, 1993
Hamilton Smith, Physiology or Medicine, 1978
Harold Varmus, Physiology or Medicine, 1989
James Watson, Physiology or Medicine, 1962

Press Contact:
Dr. Richard J. Roberts
(Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine,1993)
Tel: (978) 927-3382
Fax: (978) 921-1527
Email: roberts@neb.com

Fonte: https://mx2.arl.org/Lists/SPARC-OAForum/Message/991.html


Declaração de Salvador sobre o Acesso Aberto: a perspectiva dos países em desenvolvimento

O Acesso Aberto significa acesso e uso irrestrito da informação científica. Tem recebido apoio crescente em âmbito mundial e é considerado com entusiasmo e grande expectativa nos países em desenvolvimento.

O Acesso Aberto promove a eqüidade. Nos países em desenvolvimento, o Acesso Aberto aumentará a capacidade dos cientistas e acadêmicos de acessar e contribuir para a ciência mundial.

Historicamente, a circulação da informação científica nos países em desenvolvimento tem sido limitada por inúmeras barreiras incluindo modelos econômicos, infra-estrutura, políticas, idioma e cultura.

Consequentemente, NÓS, os participantes do International Seminar on Open Access - evento paralelo do 9º Congresso Mundial de Informação em Saúde e Bibliotecas e 7º Congresso Regional de Informação em Ciências da Saúde, concordamos que:

1. A pesquisa científica e tecnológica é essencial para o desenvolvimento social e econômico.
2. A comunicação científica é parte crucial e inerente das atividades de pesquisa e desenvolvimento. A ciência se desenvolve de forma mais eficaz quando há acesso irrestrito à informação científica.
3. Em uma perspectiva mais ampla, o Acesso Aberto favorece a educação e o uso da informação científica pelo público.
4. Em um mundo crescentemente globalizado, no qual a ciência proclama ser universal, a exclusão do acesso à informação é inaceitável. É importante que o acesso seja considerado um direito universal, independente de qualquer região geográfica.
5. O Acesso Aberto deve facilitar a participação ativa dos países em desenvolvimento no intercâmbio mundial de informação científica, incluindo o acesso gratuito ao patrimônio do conhecimento científico, a participação efetiva no processo de geração e disseminação do conhecimento, e a ampliação da cobertura de temas de relevância para os países em desenvolvimento.
6. Os países em desenvolvimento são pioneiros em iniciativas de Acesso Aberto e, portanto, desempenham função essencial na configuração do cenário de Acesso Aberto em âmbito mundial.

Portanto,

Instamos que os governos dêem alta prioridade ao Acesso Aberto nas políticas científicas incluindo:

* a exigência de que a pesquisa financiada com recursos públicos seja disponibilizada através de Acesso Aberto;
* a inclusão do custo da publicação como parte do custo de pesquisa;
* o fortalecimento dos periódicos nacionais de Acesso Aberto, de repositórios e de outras iniciativas pertinentes;
* a promoção da integração da informação científica dos países em desenvolvimento no escopo mundial do conhecimento.

Conclamamos a todos os parceiros da comunidade internacional para conjuntamente assegurar que a informação científica seja de livre acesso e disponível para todos e para sempre.

Salvador, Bahia - Brasil - 23 Setembro 2005